LADIES WHO KNOW ANTIQUE RINGS, IS THIS LEGIT?

posted 3 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
308 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

The setting is definitely in line with the Art Deco period. Do they have a heat probe so you can see that it’s a real diamond? $160 is a bargain for that time period, but I would still want to know that it’s real.

Post # 4
Member
8702 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

It is exceptionally diffcult to determine the age of a ring just by looking at it. You’d need to find maker’s marks or any other marks on the inside of the ring that could clue you in to the age. Makers and jewelers marks also vary from country to country.

Post # 5
Member
308 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

Actually, I have some additional insight on this. I had originally hoped to use my grandmother’s setting, but when my now-fiance took it to a jeweler, they pointed out that the setting, while suitable for an older, less sparkly diamond, was not an ideal candidate to set a newer stone in. My engagement ring lets in a ton more light on the shank and head than my Grandma’s ring. Looking at this setting, I would be inclined to think it is authentic because it is not a setting that would highlight a modern cut stone at all.

Post # 6
Member
295 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

@MissSweetiepie:  I work at a pawn shop, I LOVE antique rings. I am very particular in the pieces I purchases and have certain guidelines to tell the difference between real antiques and replicas. Understand, I am no jeweler nor antique specialist, however I have worked in a pawn shop for nearly 6 years and can generally tell the difference between them. The scroll work looks very hand done and “off” which is a good indication that it is antique. Replicas are generally made from casts so have a more clean, perfect design. I can’t see the diamond all that well from the photos, if it’s single cut, another good indication for being antique. Not a guarantee however as some people have single cut diamonds replaced for a more sparkly, multi-faceted diamond. Other key things to look for in distinguishing them is the stamp, if any, check to see if it’s lazer inscribed or hand stamped. Also, a ring being that old, unless stored ina jewelry box for the last 80 years will have a worn down thin shank. From the photos it seems to be the real deal to me. 🙂 

Post # 7
Member
1888 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@MissSweetiepie:  I used to have that identical ring, it came from Zales a few years ago.

Post # 8
Member
1888 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@MissSweetiepie:  I believe it retailed for around $140-$160 at the time.

Post # 9
Member
8905 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013 - Rocky Mountains USA

@MissSweetiepie:  the center stone is quite little (but so pretty, I love it!) so I think the price could be legit.  The illusion setting is definitely reminscent of the 20s-30s.

Post # 10
Member
236 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

Edit: Checking something…

Post # 12
Member
1888 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@MissSweetiepie:  A good family friend worked at Zales and so much of the jewelry my parent’s gave me as gifts came from there.  This ring came out right before I worked there one Christmas and went on sale after that season, that’s when my parent’s bought it for me.  I had it until three years ago when I sold mine to a pawn shop.  I really liked the ring, but needed the money more at the time.

Post # 13
Member
308 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@MissSweetiepie:  I would not for a second believe that Zales sold this ring. The filigree does not appear to be mass produced at all. It’s indisputably well-worn. Don’t listen to that person.

Post # 15
Member
308 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@MissSweetiepie:  Looking at the pictures you posted, the profile of the setting does appear to be quite worn. I am not an expert at all, just an enthusiast, but I don’t think it looks modern, between the high architectural setting and the wear. I regularly wear a family heirloom from the 1950s and is looks much newer that that. But softer golds were more common than, so it would stand to reason that it would show a fair amount of wear. Does it have a marking denoting the metal?

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