Lest We Forget

posted 3 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 2
Member
225 posts
Helper bee

Thank you for such a thoughtful post! It is so nice for ANZAC Day to be recognised for it’s true meaning, and not just as a day off work. Thank you also to your father for his service.

My FI has done 7 deployments whilst serving Australia, lost his two best friends in Afghanistan, and well as several other friends, one of whom was just awarded the Victoria Cross.

Although I am not Australian or a New Zealander, I live in Sydney and I couldn’t be prouder of these fine men and women that sacrifice everything for us to live the lives we want. 

Thank you to any other military spouses for supporting these special, brave people. 

Lest we forget.

Post # 4
Member
7410 posts
Busy Beekeeper

I went to the dawn service today. I go every year and I think it is important to do so. I have no problem with children marching and wearing the medals of their family members who are no longer with us or who are too fraile to march. It is about respect and being thankful and these children are showing that by taking the place of their loved one.

My great grandfather was at Gallipoli (not in the first waves thankfully), my grandfather was a POW in the second world war on the Kokoda Track and my dad served in Vietnam. So for me it is more than a day off work.

I have walked the Kokoda Track (god that was hard) and I have visited Gallipoli. The thing with Gallipoli was not the overwhelming saddness about the many lives lost but was the stories of mateship between the Aussies and Kiwis but also the relatiosnhip between the Turks and the ANZACS.

Little know facts on xmas day they all played cricket together during the cease fire. The ANZAC’s used to throw cans of spam over to the Turks (because they loved it apparently) who would throw back fresh fruit and vegies that the local villagers would bring them. The Turks would pass letters to the villagers from the ANZAC’s to be sent back to Australia. 

It was really amazing to find these things out and to see that the men (and women) who fought in this campaign are just normal everyday people who didn’t want to be there. The sad fact is that Governments still do not think about the human casualities of war and our service people are still being abandoned when home.

 

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