Local wedding customs

posted 3 years ago in Traditions
Post # 2
Member
889 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

Fun idea for a thread 🙂

I’m from the North of England:

1) we have stag and hen parties (aka bachelor/bachelorettes)

2) ceremonies start earlier (typically 1-2pm) then there is a wedding ‘breakfast’ (reception meal,  toast, speeches etc) followed by the ‘evening party’ (drinks, dancing and possibly a late snack)

3) it is common to invite some people to the evening party only and not to the daytime celebrations. 

4) Bridal showers, rehearsal dinners and even having a MOH are still pretty rare (although US TV programmes are making people more aware of them)

5) Traditionally, the bride and groom should not see each other the night before the wedding. We’re a pretty superstitious bunch when it comes to including ‘something old,  something new….etc etc’ as well

6) The average engagement length is about 18 months and the cost of an average wedding is now £17000 (approx US$25000)

7) outdoor weddings are not legally binding. 

Post # 3
Member
1670 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

I’m from the South (more specifically, North Carolina, the south is a very varied reigon, and then more specifically, my social circle)

Some local things for us:

1. You display your bridal portrait at your reception. I have no idea why, you just do. I’m excited to have mine done and also not worry about capturing lots of good photos of my dress on the day.

2. Your mother’s friends are usually the ones who throw your shower. All my showers/parties are being thrown by people who have watched me grow up. Bridesmaids and family members usually aren’t involved in throwing showers in my circle.

3. Most weddings I’ve been to back home have a band, not a DJ.

4. A gap is not common. Once the wedding starts, the party is on all night. Most weddings I’ve been to back home are evening weddings for this reason.

5. People give actual gifts, not cash, as wedding presents. Typically they send them to your home (or your mother’s home) instead of bringing them in to the party. There is no emphasis at all on “paying for your plate” – hosting the party means not expecting a return!

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