low TSH in 1st trimester?

posted 3 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
292 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

I’m very familure with TSH but don’t be alarm why. I had thyroid cancer, so my thyroid was taken out. So I really on my Meds to replace all of my TSH. 

TSH is your thyroid stimulat hormones, thyroid levels. The average person levels need to be between I believe it now is 5.00 to .30 (think $5.00 to 30’cents) if your levels are off they might want to give you medication like cytomel or levoxol or something similar. It a tiny pill, you take it on an empty stomach first thing in the morning. The process is harmless, aslong as you follow your endo doctors order you will be fine. It will not harm your baby if you take it

But it very important, low levels can be harmful to your baby. Plus it will make you faituge, weakness, nause and etc. there more.

my greatest advice… Which I’m told all the time is be very involved with your doctor. It might seem a small thing they want to monitor but if brush it off it could be both harmful to you or your baby.  

So don’t be alarm just be aware, and let them watch you. basically they just change the Meds to meet your needs since the baby stealing your TSH from you and your thyroid can’t keep up. So they replace it with a pill so both you and baby get what you need.

any question feel free to ask! 

Jac

Post # 4
Member
1563 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I have had low TSH throughout my pregnancy. I think my level is/was .5. You can have low TSH and have everything be okay with the baby. Seeing the endocrinologist just means that you will be very closely monitored (blood work at least once a month if not more) and if your levels get low enough to require intervention, then you will most likely be given PTU, which is safe for pregnancy. I actually used to take PTU while I had Graves’ disease. 

Post # 5
Member
386 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

@AstoriaK:  I’m guessing that OP’s TSH is low meaning a high number.

@Glasgowbound:  High numbers = hypothyroid = not enough thyroid hormone.  You would just take a little pill to help replace your naturally produced thyroid hormone so that your number goes down.  I had my thyroid removed in Oct of 2011 because I had a large nodule on it.  We had monitored it for a long time, so we knew that my comfortable thyroid level is .5-1.0  That is where I feel the best.  Normal is .5 (or sometimes less) to 5.0, but newer data recommends .3 – 3.0.  Ideally during pregnancy you want to be between .5 and 2.5.  My TSH started creeping up during the first trimester. I was .9 at 5 weeks, 1.8 at 9 weeks, and 3.03 at 13 weeks. I’ve had my dose slightly increased once it hit 3.03. 

The only issue with the thyroid medicine (if you are leaning hypo like I suspect) is that you can’t take any calcium/iron/antacids within 4 hours of taking the synthroid/levothroxine/whatever they put you on.

Post # 6
Member
1563 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@MrsBG:  Low TSH=hyperthyroidism so if the doctor said it was low then would that not indicate hyper not hypo? The OP did not mention anything other than the doctor saying that it was low.

 

Post # 7
Member
386 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

@AstoriaK:  You are correct that low tsh = hyper, but people often say confusing things because low tsh = high/hyper thyroid function and high tsh = low functioning.  It gets confusing when high is low and low is high. 

 

@Glasgowbound:  If you remember, let us know when you get your number.  It would be interesting if you did end up hyper during pregnancy. I feel like typically it goes the other way.

Post # 9
Member
386 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

@Glasgowbound:  Very strange… I guess maybe better than my issue.  My TSH was making me SO tired.  Good luck. Hopefully you just need extra monitoring.

Post # 10
Member
1563 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@Glasgowbound:  Ah, ok! They will just monitor you very closely to ensure that your levels are not changing drastically. Typically, hyperthyroidism in pregnancy is easier to manage than hypo. Also, make sure that they have a plan to keep monitoring you after pregnancy. Sometimes, those who are slightly hyper during pregnancy can end up having post-partum thyroiditis. I already have a two month postpartum check set for April with my endo just to ensure that we are watching my levels carefully! I hope all continues to go really well with your pregnancy!

 

Post # 11
Member
3989 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I certainly don’t think it’s anything to get all worked up over unless you are actually feeling serious systems.  Heart palpitations?  Having trouble gaining weight?  Hair loss?  Really cold fingers or toes?

Either way definitely see an endocronologist when you can.  But I don’t think with your levels you have anything to be rushing to them about.

Post # 12
Member
113 posts
Blushing bee

I’m bumping this to see if anyone else has anything new to say about low TSH during the first trimester. My doctor found that my TSH was 0.2 during my 6 week bloodwork (before my BFP, it was 0.9). My doctor’s office seemed to not even want me to do a free T4 test so I’m a bit lost about what to do. Would love to hear from someone who had a similar experience!

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