(Closed) Marriage and Education

posted 7 years ago in Relationships
Post # 3
Member
3564 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

To me, this seems like a case of mistaking correlation for causation. I don’t believe that by being more highly educated, you’re more likely to get married/stay married. I DO believe that if you’re highly educated you’re more likely to be more well off (or at least not poor), more likely to have a job/financial security, possibly have the support of family (who may have helped pay for that education), and that education is valued (and possibly that marriage is valued as well)–and all these factors make it more likely that you will get married/stay married.

ETA that it also seems like the article has an agenda–seems to believe that more religious a person is, the better their family life is going to be (and heaven forbid if a couple has kids without being married–that’s not the “American Dream” as they say).

Post # 4
Member
4824 posts
Honey bee

@hilsy85: Agree. Also that with couples who have additional education they likely married later in life and not as young, thereby having had more life experiences, grown into the people they will become etc.

Post # 6
Member
1480 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

This article is an example of why I hate pop-psych news articles. Especially by CNN.

“The report cites an adherence to a “marriage mindset,” which means religious attendance and faith in marriage is now a way of life for the highly educated.”

“”Marriage has gotten weaker” with the decline of churches and civic group in communities”

Hold up, WHAT?!

Oh, I get it. This report was released by the Center for Marriage and Families at the Institute of American Values. Excuse me while I go laugh my a$$ off at the absurdity of this.

Post # 7
Member
2090 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Haha, I was just reading this yesterday and thought about posting it. I am always highly suspicious of studies done by groups with targeted feel good key words in their name like the “Institute for American Values”.

I don’t agree with this correlation: “Highly educated women also are getting married more and staying in those relationships longer, according to the report, which suggests this is a “striking reversal of historic trends” The report cites an adherence to a “marriage mindset,” which means religious attendance and faith in marriage is now a way of life for the highly educated.” I don’t think these higher rates really have anything to do with being religious, as atheists have one of the lowest divorce rates.

I think too – that stats like these are always missing something. Depending on who they sampled and how they did the sample, a portion of the “lowest educated” sample is lowest educated simply because they are young when they are sampled. Without providing age detail, it seems hard to say that 33% of children are born to moderately educated mothers – 4 years afterwards, how many of those would then have to be redefined as “highly educated” because they finished their 4 year degree?

Post # 8
Member
2392 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

It seems really obvious to me that more-educated men and women would have more faith in marriage, because the divorce rates are so much lower for those couples.

I agree that the correllation seems way out of whack… I don’t think educated men and women are more likely to be religious, so why would marriage be suffering in middle America because of less religious involvement.  I think it’s more that the financial returns to education are higher and that it’s harder to have a successful marriage in an environment of financial insecurity.

Post # 9
Member
3564 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@Moose1209: Yup, I agree. But I do hope that more people join in, since like you said, it’s always good to hear other opinions! 🙂

Post # 11
Member
1986 posts
Buzzing bee

I agree with Hilsy, she said it well 🙂

Post # 12
Member
608 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

Anyone read the actual report?  I read about half of it and it has a bit of a different focus then CNN article.  Worth reading the actual source of this article.

Post # 13
Member
3788 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

My thoughts on the underlying issue, as expressed by Jorge Cham:

Post # 14
Member
1684 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I’ll just throw this out there: – and this is just my thought on the matter, no scientific data to back it up –  If you are more highly educated, then you’re more likely to be married to someone who is also highly educated, and therefore would both share the same core values and traits (ambition, drive, financial security, etc). To me its not a matter of both having post-secondary education (or higher), persay, as it is having compatible traits typical of those who do seek out some form of higher education.

I hesitate to say that the risk of drug/alcohol abuse, neglect, “dead beat” syndrome, etc, is non-existant, because that can happen no matter what your education level (and does), but I could hypothesize that these occurances would be greatly reduced because they don’t stereotypically occur within the type of person that seeks out some form of higher education.

Also, with higher education – more than likely – comes greater financial security and a sense of personal freedom because of it. I once heard that the two things couples fight the most about are in-laws and money, and I have no doubt that’s true. If you have a bit of a cushion, either by careful financial management or a well-paying job (or both!) then that goes a long way to alleviate stress within a marriage. And – and this may be controversial and I realize that – but I would even go as far as to say that if you are the female partner and have invested in your education, and  then subsequent career, then you are more likely to contribute financially throughout the partnership, therefore building to the financial security concept as a whole.

I’m probably way off base on all this, but anyway. Take what you will from it. Just be gentle :$ 🙂

Post # 15
Member
1767 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@bebefly: I think you may be onto something with the idea that the general economic status of highly enducated women leaves them with more financial stability, and potentially fewer marriage problems. I certainly believe that the “weakening” of marriages has much more to do with the economy than the decline of religious organizations. Money is a big deal that effects everyone, regardless of their decision whether or not to participate in organized religion.

On another note, I think that their conclusion that marriage values decline with religious ones is a pretty big jump- I don’t affiliate myself with any religion, but I’m a firm believer in the love and union of marriage.

It’s my opinion that the article had an agenda- but one could also argue that I have a bias to begin with. So take that as you will. 

Post # 16
Member
1684 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

@Miss Fish: I completely agree. What does religion have to do with marriage and the state of (or lack of) it? Did you know that there is – oh, maybe, 3 things on marriage in the ENTIRE BIBLE?

The fact of the matter is this: religion needs marriage. It needs it desperately. It needs it to make sure that whatever particular brand of faith doesn’t die out by people marrying into different faiths, and also to ensure that the next generation grows up repeating the same dogma and believing the same thing as the person over in the next pew does. It’s quite a self-sustaining system and it’s worked for centuries, as you probably are quite aware. 🙂

Marriage, on the other hand, does not need religion. It can more than adequately stand up for itself, by itself, regardless of any gender boundary, religious affliation or even state law.

I have no doubt in my mind that this article has a skewed perspective and certainly has, as other pp have stated, an agenda to fulfill. Because of this, it can hardly be trusted to be a voice of any kind on the subject, much less given the credence it has been so far. To say that marriage values decline because of declining religion values is just a blantantly ignorant, extremely narrow viewpoint, hastily drawn conclusion to the whole issue.

Did we not just state that marriage does not need religion? And if it doesn’t need religion, it SURE as heck doesn’t need any sort of “religious values” either.

And don’t get me started on what are probably countless marriages that are filled with partners who are guilty of cheating on, lying to, neglecting their spouse or even so far as being physically abusive, but whose “religious values” prohibit the couple from divorcing, or giving the woman some sort of separate identity from her husband, or even something as painfully simple as a voice to be heard with.

Pfft. Decline of marriage values because religious values are declining? I really don’t think so. And next time maybe the Center for Marriage and Families at the Institute of American Values could either be a bit more subtle in their attempts to whack us over the head with blantantly false information, or better yet, just skip the entire excerise and put their biased, heavily partial “values” propaganda bullsh*t right into the recycling bin.
AMEN.

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