(Closed) Men in "traditional" marriages more likely to discriminate…

posted 6 years ago in Relationships
Post # 3
Member
10563 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

I didn’t read the whole article.  Men who don’t believe in gender equality are more likely to be in a ‘traditional marriage’.  They would therefore skew the results for all the men in traditional marriages.  I would expect to see a correlation.  What I see as the cause and effect is backwards from how the hypothesis was made though.

Post # 5
Member
10563 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

The more I think about this, the more surprised I am that it was accepted for publication!

Post # 6
Member
1628 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@AB Bride:  It’s a working paper so it wasn’t lol, but the full study has a bit more to it than that (men in ‘traditional marriages’ actually show more bias than men in “non-traditional marriages” in looking over resumes that are exactly the same except for indication of gender…it’s a quasi-experiment since they can’t randomly assign marriage but technically solid)

Post # 7
Member
1734 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Oh my God, there are so many things that I want to say about this, and I KNOW that all of them should make me bite my tongue! But this does not surprise me — and I’m sorry, but I can’t help but think that I would have a really difficult time getting along with a co-worker who proudly described their marriage as “traditional.” (According to whose traditions? Honestly.)

 

Post # 8
Member
10563 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

@bearlove:  To me it just seems obvious that married sexist jerks are more likely to have a traditional marriage, and itsn’t worthy of a study.  I’m not in social sciences though, and many of the things are are *actually published* surprise me.

Post # 9
Member
10563 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

@village_skeptic:  The traditional marriage definition was the authors of the paper.  I’m also not a fan of the term.  There was modern, traditional, and neo (wife working part time).

Post # 10
Member
1309 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

Oh my, all I can say is… I think the choice of terminology says more about the people who did the study, than the subjects themselves.

So a partnership with a stay-at-home wife is “traditional” and a working wife means a “modern” marriage? That’s funny because I work (and intend to keep working) and I consider my relationship very traditional!

I have friends who stay home who nevertheless have a very non-traditional family dynamic.

There’s very little sociological research that’s of value, because when it comes down to it, it’s not a hard science, it’s almost impossible to get objective data. For instance who knows why the men didn’t like the female resumes, sure it’s suspicious they liked boy versions much better, but unless you come out and ask them Why Didn’t You Like This Resume? the researchers are making assumptions about their motivations.

Post # 11
Member
2651 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

Correlation does not equal causation. 

Post # 13
Member
1628 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@Magdalena:  errr, I’m not a sociologist but that was a pretty general statement and your conclusions were off-base…the point of the study wasn’t WHY do they discriminate, it was asking the first question of DO they discriminate….then you run follow-up studies on why (which generally moves into the hands of the psychologists…and if you think asking people why they did something is the best approach, I’m guessing you don’t have a strong background in soc/psych because that is one of the most unreliable methods). And social science has produced a lot of great information that has direct impact on people’s daily lives and is used to reduce prejudice and sexism in a way that goes beyond “common sense” (and a lot of “common sense” interventions have been shown to make things worse). There’s a difference between a finding or a study you don’t like and a slam on an entire field.

Post # 16
Member
1628 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@AB Bride:  true enough that it seems pretty obvious, but since I straddle the hard and “soft” sciences (my PhD is joint social-psychology and neuroscience) I can tell you I’ve seen really supposedly obvious things in literature from the “hard” sciences too

Side rant: I honestly blame the media but they always seem to publicize the obvious stuff and then it makes all the sciences (hard and soft) look like we’re doing only really obvious and dumb work. As an example I remember a recent paper that got all sorts of buzz showing that people with paranoid schizophrenia who smoke pot are more likely to experience a bout of paranoid…um, duh? Or all the papers that continue to get published showing that binge drinking is bad for your health, or the flood of studies that get published on soda making you fat (the first few fine, but now it’s beating a dead horse long past showing replication)

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