(Closed) Miss versus Ms.

posted 7 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 3
Member
331 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

If they are kids, I’d use Miss. Over 18, I’d go with Ms. Miss technically isn’t incorrect for adult women, but being 30 and unmarried, I’d be annoyed at Miss and much prefer Ms.

Post # 4
Member
3176 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Ms. is considered more professional, Miss is for a younger individual.

Post # 5
Member
2209 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

The difference is that Miss refers exclusively to unmarried women, while Ms. is marriage neutral. That means Ms. can be used for married and unmarried women.

I prefer Ms. to both Miss and Mrs. myself, but I think nonimouse12’s advice is sound.

Post # 6
Member
136 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

I agree; I think that Ms. is much more adult and respectful.

Post # 7
Member
3126 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

I don’t think anyone older than 18 (to the day) should be referred to as Miss. People in the south use Miss all the time with first names and it makes my skin crawl, like it does when adults use the word Daddy.

Post # 8
Member
1927 posts
Buzzing bee

Before I was married I always checked “Miss” when I had to fill out forms.  I personally just don’t like the ambiguity of  “Ms.” but that’s a personal preference and I married at 25 so I was always pretty young.  I assume most people would probably prefer “Ms.” unless they are quite young.

Post # 9
Member
229 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

I agree with MelissaBegins!

I took some class after high school that was all about letters/adressing etc. (why I took this, who knows!). Anywho, it says any woman over the age of 18 who is unmarried should be adresses as Ms. Miss is for teenagers/children.

Post # 10
Member
642 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I would use Ms.  It’s a title for an unmarried or married woman (I have a friend who is married, but did not take her husbands name, so I’ll  use Ms. to address her invitation).  Miss is usually for young ladies, and Ms. for adults.  I’ve preferred Ms. since I was about 18.  Plus, I plan to use Miss and Master for the children we’ll be inviting to the wedding.  Hope that helps.  If you do a quick internet search I’m sure you’ll get a lot of hits.

Post # 12
Member
1676 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

This was the most difficult part of addressing for me!  I generally used “Miss” for unmarried women, and “Mrs.” for married women.  However, my parents and some of their friends are serious hippies, so they far prefer “Ms.” to “Mrs.”  (They don’t like being identified by their marital status.)  On that count, I took it on a case-by-case basis.  I also used “Ms.” for unmarried women in their 40’s or older…

Post # 13
Member
990 posts
Busy bee

I was curious about this question too…my FMIL being never married I wanted to call her Miss but she prefered Ms. I thought Ms was for women who had been married but were not currently or engaged but that cleared that up…thanks bees!

Post # 15
Member
3126 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

I kind of prefer to be called Ms. now that i’m married, too. I don’t like that men can just be Mr. and women must be titled based on their marital status. It seems like such an outdated concept.

Post # 16
Member
2250 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2017

I looked it up and found something that said miss for under 25 and my husbands sister was all in a tizzy that her invitation sadi miss. She is 21.

The topic ‘Miss versus Ms.’ is closed to new replies.

Get our weekly roundup of the best of Weddingbee.
I agree to receive emails from the site. I can withdraw my consent at any time by unsubscribing.

Find Amazing Vendors