(Closed) My dog is having seizures…maybe? Advice needed.

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
2878 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 1996

@Quietserenity:  I would take him to the vet, explain what’s happened, and say that finances are an issue. Ask what tests the vet would start with given X budget.

The dog ate diapers? The cloth kind? Or disposables? Has he been eliminating normally? I wonder if he could have some kind of blockage.

Post # 4
Member
5968 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2018

It’s ok, you didnt do anything wrong, really.  When it comes to dogs and seizures, there are a gew breeds more prone to it than others, but it’s not uncommon.  Your vet has limited resources when it comes to diagnosing, and will have to rule out allergic reaction, toxcitiy, brain tumors and other problems with blood tests and x-rays.  If all that comes up negative, you’ve got a dog who has seizures…which is totally treatable and easy to manage with medicine and the knowledge that every once in a while, your dog is going to have one.

I know several people who have dogs that live happy, healthy, normal lives with the occaisional seizure, so don’t worry, it will all be ok one way or the other, but it’s certainly not the end of your dog.

Post # 5
Member
2878 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 1996

If it comes to that, there might be a shelter you could surrender the dog to who would treat him and then re-home him once his health was stable (depending on what shelters are like where you live.) That would be better than putting him down, which I certainly wouldn’t do to a 4 year old dog without more research.

Post # 6
Member
3886 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I don’t think any vet worth their salt will treat just the symptoms of seizure without exploring the root cause. 

As far as balancing cost with the life of the pet, it’s a tough call and only you can decide where the line is.  Many will be very willing to go into debt to get proper medical care for the dog— I once had a dog that turned into a very expensive dog, and I paid over $15k in assorted surgeries over her life, and while I didn’t have to borrow money from my family or friends, I did put those bills on a credit card and it did take a long time for me to pay it off, so that’s basically the same thing.  I don’t regret it, in hindsight, but I do know that I honestly could not have afforded more than another $5k or so if it had come to that.   I think it’s probably wise to have your maximum expense already in mind before you start to see the vet bills because it’s too hard to make financial decisions when you’re under emotional stress.  You also have to factor in the expected quality of life for your pet as you scope out those bills; $15k would not have been worth spending if the poor dog would have lived the rest of her days in pain, but was worth it since she was able to be healthy, happy and comfortable for many years.

Post # 7
Member
8487 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2014

Poor baby =( They definitely sound like seizures. Ugh, forgive me, but please tell your mom and sister to not give you any more advice when it comes to your pets. 

Definitely describe them to the vet. There isnt much they will be able to do without doing tests though. If you cant afford it then you could see if you qualify for a payment plan.

I got one of my dogs as a stray and he had heartworms. The treatment was $600, but I was able to pay a little at a time. He also had seizures after the treatment was done, but they warned me that that may happen, and there wouldnt be anything that could be done about it while it was happening. Its definitely scary. =(

Post # 8
Member
8164 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

If it is seizures I believe they are treated fairly easily with a relatively inexpensive medication (phenobarbital?). I don’t think that’s something you could do without a vet’s opinion though, even if you could manage to get the meds without a prescription.

Post # 9
Member
409 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

Sorry to hear this 🙁

 

How old is your dog? My dohas started having fits when she got to the age of 13. Like your poor doggy, they weren’t frequent to begin with, but increased in frequency and intensity over about a month or so. We made the sad decision to have her put to sleep in the end as it just wasn’t fair on her. 

However, treatment wise, for our dog, because of her age, the vet said that it was just a case of a deterioration in her health because she was old. He said that if they have seizures, you should open all the doors and windows to get cool air in, and keep noise to a minimum as it aids their recovery when they wake. 

Obviously if your dog is say, 5 years old, it’s not to do with old age. It could be epilepsy, or an imbalance in the nervous system. 

 

Either way, I’d get the poor thing checked out my a vet. Make a note in your diary of how often and how long they go on for as that’ll help the vet advise you. 

 

Fingers crossed for you! 

Post # 10
Member
349 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

OMG do not listen to your mother or sister (especially your mother-Dear God!).  Go to your vet & explain what happened.  My beagle has had 2 seizures in the past, but my vet did not put him on medication because the side effects can be bad & the seizures were years apart. He told me just to monitor him & if they became more frequent to come back.

The vet will give you options, but the most important thing is to make sure your dog isn’t in pain or that there’s something seriously wrong with him. Explain to your vet that money is a concern & he or she will work with you.  It would be cruel to make your dog suffer.

Post # 12
Member
5663 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

It is really sad that someone’s answer to a seizure would be “just put him down” they are pefectly treatable. You need to start by taking the dog to the vet. However I know a few people who’s dogs have had this happen and then it never happens again, it’s just a fluke sometimes. But you won’t know that until you take him in.

Post # 13
Member
2106 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Mannnny things cause seizures in dogs. What breed is your dog? 

Possible causes: epilepsy, idiopathic head tremors (less likely if dog’s eyes are unfocused), inner ear infection, inner ear issues in general (especially with older dogs). 

Don’t let the dog out of your sight. See if you can identify a trigger for the seizures. If you can, video tape the dog experiencing the symptoms. If the dog is a crashing around, secure the dog and attempt to calm him. Most dogs do not crash around when they are having a seizure- usually they fall down with stiff or paddling legs and have extended symptoms after the seizure: blindness, disorientation, etc.  

Post # 14
Member
881 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

I would be make sure to mention that your dog ate diapers on Thanksgiving.  Those are made to be very absorbent and therefore can be incredibly difficult for a dog’s body to break down.  My dog ate one of my tampons last year and was fine for a few days until it got stuck in her intestines and she needed surgery to have it removed.  She acted extremely lethargic, threw up, and eventually would snap at you if you tried to touch her tummy or pick her up.  She also cried terribly especially at night right before we took her in for sugery.  Unfortunately, since tampons and diapers are not made of metal, they don’t really show up on an xray so we had to do exploratory surgery.  Not saying this is related to your dog’s issues, but it is best to give the vets all of the information you have so they are aware of the circumstances.  Good luck to you, I hope your dog feels better very soon!

Post # 16
Member
1297 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

I’m an almost-vet, and here is my advice:

Take him to the veterinarian. It sounds like yes, it could be seizures. There aren’t really tests to run to diagnose for sure. The most important thing the vet will need is a good, detailed history like you’ve given us here.

Seizures are pretty scary to go through, but there are several medication options to treat them now. Your vet will be the best resource to help you decide what’s right for you.

Good luck!

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