My mom just got diagnosed with colon cancer…

posted 3 years ago in Emotional
Post # 3
Member
9137 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

@tropicalfish914:  My aunt was diagnosed approximately 10 years ago.  She lost a ton of weight during treatment but since she was caught before the cancer metastasized, it was very treatable and as far as I know she has been in remission for quite a while.  It’s okay to be upset and think it’s unfair; you might even want to attend a support group for family members to help cope with the diagnosis and find out what to expect while she is getting treatment.

Hopefully your mom will have an easy treatment and be in remission in no time.  Other than that, spend lots of quality time with her and tell her how brave she is (rather than how sorry you are for her.)

Post # 4
Member
7664 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

My Uncle and Great Uncle have both had colon cancer.

My advice would be to get a list of your options right away. There are multiple types of therapy, and various different types of operation, for all cancers. It isn’t one size fits all and you should feel empowered to actively make choices.

Personally, having watched family members with various different cancers, I always swore that I would get the most invasive operation possible, combined with the least possible chemo. But everyone is different. You need to realistically consider your options, even though it seems so scary right now!

Hoping for the best for you.

Post # 5
Member
1959 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@tropicalfish914:  I don’t have any experience with colon cancer, but I do just want to give you support and say how sorry I am that you and your family are going through this. 

Post # 6
Member
188 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’m so sorry. My mom was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2008 at age 51. They caught it early enough that she needed surgery and didn’t have to do chemo or radiation. The day they found it is the day she had surgery. It was a long recovery after her colon resection surgery and she still has bowel issues. She also now gets adhesions and was hospitalized last year because of a blockage from the adhesions and had to have surgery again. My mom is a strong person who is used to doing everything for everyone so it was hard to see her so weak, but she was always happy throughout. It’s a hard thing to go through, but out of all types of cancers, colon cancer is one of the most treatable. Praying for your mom and family and please let me know if you have any questions at all!

Post # 7
Member
419 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

I’m sorry you are going through this. My thoughts are with you and your family. 

Post # 8
Member
118 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

@tropicalfish914:  I’m so, so sorry. That has to be so tough. My boss’s mother had colon cancer, but she made it and is living a fairly normal life right now (she’s actually a CMO for a HUGE international company, so I’d say she’s doing quite well in fact), so there’s definitely hope that it’s beatable and that her quality of life will be excellent after she’s beaten the cancer. 

Hugs and good thoughts your way, my dear. 

Post # 9
Member
1168 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@tropicalfish914:  As knowing a few close people who have gone through chemo, I can tell you that the experience is HIGHLY unique. Some people do OK, some people dont. Just know hopeful and positive thoughts, go a long long way- for everyone involved. Doing some special things (such as eating favorite foods, going places with lots of people, plan a day trip, doing the things you cant do while on chemo) before starting treatment is a big deal AND planning things to do after treatment. You could also prepare for the treatments by preparing comfy clothes, looking in to stomach friendly recipes, gathering things to do (boredom + feeling ill= no fun), gathering helpful items in gerneral. I would also make sure your mom has someone to help with house work and such. 

 

Post # 10
Member
1843 posts
Buzzing bee

My grandfather had colon cancer. Underwent treatment and, although very tough on his system, he did very well for a few years. His was pretty advanced though and also his age didn’t help much (elderly). 

Can’t see if you are from the US. If you are, I would like to reccomend a non profit that might help you channel eveything from best specific treatment centers to financial aid and emotional support. 

A big hug to you and your mom and my best wishes of a smooth as possible and fast and full recovery.

 

Post # 11
Member
1843 posts
Buzzing bee

My grandfather had colon cancer. Underwent treatment and, although very tough on his system, he did very well for a few years. His was pretty advanced though and also his age didn’t help much (elderly). 

Can’t see if you are from the US. If you are, I would like to reccomend a non profit that might help you channel eveything from best specific treatment centers to financial aid and emotional support. 

A big hug to you and your mom and my best wishes of a smooth as possible and fast and full recovery.

 

Post # 12
Member
1843 posts
Buzzing bee

Sorry bees. Accidental double post :-/

Post # 13
Member
3756 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

My grandfather had it like 20 years ago, they caught it early, he had surgery. I’m not even sure how much chemo/radiation he went through, I was young. But I remember it being a pretty quick process and he’s been living without complications since then. I know it’s different for everyone, and I hope they caught it early and can treat it. I def agree with other posters that a second opinion, maybe even third might be a good idea. In the case of colon cancer, I would definitely want surgery asap if possible.

Post # 14
Member
424 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@tropicalfish914:  I’m so sorry to hear about your mother.  I think once you know more information about her diagnosis from the doctor about how advanced the cancer is, you’ll have something more concrete to wrap your head around. 

A dear mentor of mine was diagnosed with early stage colon cancer maybe 5 years ago.  She had surgery and now is doing well.

You and your family are in my thoughts and prayers.

Post # 15
Member
2419 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

I’m so sorry to hear your news. For sure, a cancer diagnosis will always turn your life upside down. But equally, current treatments are much more bearable and much more effective than they were even a few years ago. Also, if you research cancer on the internet – and you will because we all do! – be aware that some of the information is outdated. If you were in the UK I would strongly advise visiting the Macmillan Cancer website but I’m sure there must be a reliable US equivalent.

I’m afraid I have quite a lot of current experience about colon and bowel cancer because my DH has Stage 4 bowel cancer. He was diagnosed in April and since June has been on an intensive regime of chemotherapy (3 months) because his tumour was inoperable due to the size and position of it. He is currently on a brief treatment holiday before starting radiotherapy (every day for 5 weeks) plus another course of chemotherapy at the same time after which he’ll have another review.

I wouldn’t like to say we’ve had the best summer of our lives but it really isn’t all doom and gloom and life goes on rather more normally than I would have assumed when we got his diagnosis. For starters, everyone’s cancer is individual and everyone’s reaction to treatment is equally so. We thought that chemo would be a journey into a nauseous hell but actually, it hasn’t been. For sure it is exhausting and there are weird side effects – acute cold sensitivity on the hottest days, loss of taste buds and a profound loss of energy plus he’s been hospitalised once because of a viral illness that his compromised immune system didn’t like – but nowadays, oncologists aim at trying to balance chemotherapy so that patients are not made so ill by the treatment that it is counterproductive. In particular, most oncologists are extremely pro-active about preventing nausea. Also, the drugs used to treat bowel cancer do not necessarily cause hair loss.

If your mother is a strong woman with a positive attitude this will help enormously. As I said above, while chemo is not a breeze, it does not have to be as awful as I expect most of us assume. The important thing with cancer though is to take everything one stage at a time. Which is how her treatment regime will progress. Nowadays (and certainly here in the UK) doctors are very reluctant to offer mortality-related timelines until things are at a very late stage indeed. So after each stage of your mother’s treatment, there will be a review at which your mother can, and should, ask the sort of questions that make it possible for her to make balanced judgements about future treatment.

Please feel free to message me if there’s anything I can help with though. It’s a tough journey but by no means automatically a hopeless one. But never feel bad about getting angry. Cancer is an unwelcome guest that really doesn’t deserve to be treated with respect!

Post # 16
Member
810 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: Either Philadelphia City Hall or a small chapel.

I haven’t lost anybody close to me to cancer or had anybody with it, but, FH’s step-dad has stage 4 prostate cancer. He gets chemo and all of that. I don’t know what stage your mother is in, but, he’s survived longer than he was supposed to by years & still does stuff he loves though it is taxing at times.

 

 

 

That being said, there is always hope in even the darkest of times. I wish her the best in a speedy and easy-as-possible recovery.

 

 

 

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