My tablet hates racist phrases!

posted 3 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 3
Hostess
8680 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

I just brush racial slurs off, they can really be directed towards any color.

I once got called a “pastey faced white girl” by a customer [who wasn’t white] simply because she was angry with me.

Cracker doesn’t offend me, I think it’s quite silly. When someone calls me a cracker I tell them I’m not a cracker.. I’m so white that I’m glow-in-the-dark.

I’ve never been called it, but I know a few friends who get called “white trash” alot.

And, one of the ladies who just recently retired at my work [thank goodness, she was awful!] loved calling people “toothless hillbillies”. What? Who does that?

Post # 4
Member
292 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2017

I’m really pale and unfortunately can never tan no matter how I try! So of course people make pale comments to me, mostly jokes in the summer time when they’re all getting tan and I’m not. I don’t know if someone would consider that racist, but I don’t. Race isn’t a big deal to me, honestly. And I also don’t mind the white girl stereotype jokes that go around- heck I even half way relate to it, and I know a lot of girls who fit the description! It’s just not a big deal to me.

Post # 5
Hostess
8680 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

Oh, and I forgot to add that one of my friends had a baby with a black man.. and their family nicknamed the baby “Oreo”, luckily, nobody takes offense!

Post # 6
Member
1057 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@jenilynevette:  Did both families nickname the baby Oreo? Or did just your friend’s family? I ask because that term is incredibly offensive in the Black community (in general). Incredibly offensive. The term references Black people that “act” White (Black people that speak intelligently, and/or have White friends/significant others). Just wanted to figure out why anyone would be okay with their child being called such an offensive term? Very sad.

 

Post # 7
Member
804 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I think it’s important to realize that slurs against white people simply don’t have the power that slurs against groups that have historically been discriminated against do.  It’s similar to the arguement why do we have women’s studies departments but not men’s studies… just not thought through all the way.

 

Post # 9
Member
641 posts
Busy bee

I think that casual use and universal acceptance causes words to lose power. I remember there was a push in the 90s that black was an offensive word. Nazi used to be a powerful and horrifying word, but within a generation, we’ve completely depowered it by using it as a descriptive of things as base as reinforcing the correct use of their. Nigger was a powerful word despite casual use when it was not universally accepted, but with it being more accepted by black people (and reclaimed by them as some would say) the word is losing a lot of power. It still lacks universal acceptance, as much of the population refuses to touch it, it’s split between casual descriptive and hateful slur, but it’s getting there.

In terms of being described by an archaic racial slur, I don’t think I’d react outside of the quaintness of someone using old hateful words, similar to if someone said I looked like a “lady of the night.”

Post # 10
Hostess
8680 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2014

@LBeeLove:  The father’s side started it, and the mothers side just went along with it.

Post # 12
Member
279 posts
Helper bee

@babeba:  

@jenilynevette:  

Sort of like the Oreo story. My FI and I are both white. He group up in a mostly hispanic neighborhood and city. All of his close friends were hispanic (mostly mexican) and they called him “Uh-oh” (like the uh-oh oreos) or “Blanco”.  He played soccer and was really good and was the only white guy in their group that played soccer. They meant it as a complement (I mean these guys are still his best friends).  I thought you ladies might be amused. 

Post # 13
Member
964 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

@Polygon:  Exactly. I can’t stand when white people crawl out of the woodwork, like – “This one time, I wasn’t in a white-dominated space, which I a usually am, and some homeless black guy, one time, called me a cracker!!!”

Post # 15
Member
2163 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I don’t know. I’ve had a few people use their racism against me in my lifetime and sometimes it hurts, sometimes it doesn’t. I think what really hurts me is who it’s coming from, like a younger person or someone who is older, because with younger people, it’s like someone taught them to be that way, and older people, they are old enough to know better but they are racist anyway. When someone my age says something racist I feel like they are doing it only to hurt me and using whatever weapon they have.

Post # 16
Member
964 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

@babeba:  I’m sure it just depends on the person, and maybe how high their acceptable bullshit level is that day. If someone calls you a little-known slur or an older slur, and you are a minority, you are still used to being mistreated/marginalized by the dominant group. So, in that case, the word would probably be offensive because you know the *intent.* You know why they’re using it. And that’s the real issue – how the words are used. That’s why there’s so much debate over whether historically-awful words can be reappropriated.

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