Need some advice as I switch doctors

posted 3 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
898 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

@atlbride2013:  A midwife would be the person in charge of your care. A doula is a support person for labor, like a labor coach.

You are still able to get the first tri scan at 13 weeks but you’d have to go in NOW.

If you are interested in water birth, I’d start calling up midwives/birth centers in your area and asking who does them and where you can have one.

A midwife will have a doctor behind her IF she is working through a hospital. If she is working in a birth center or under her own office, she will not. It’s completely unnecessary anyway, because the doc will only take over if you become high risk.

A midwife will join you at the hospital if for some reason you end up in the hospital during your labor/delivery. However, much of the time, this means you’ll be paying two people, both doc and midwife for attendance and insurance only covers one. Some women opt to have the midwife attend at the hospital since they help to advocate more natural techniques and are more invested in your care than a doc is.

Any other questions, feel free to ask!

 

Post # 4
Member
5697 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

I have not given birth yet but this is what I know:

 

1. I’m 13weeks today, is it now too late to do the first trimester screen? I’m uninterested in doing an amniocentesis at 16 weeks because of how invasive the test is, however, I do want to know if the baby is at risk for genetic abnormalities. The doctor basically scared the crap out of us with his statistics, even though we have no family histories of the tested disorders and I’m only 28.

 

No, the NT scan is done anywhere between 11 and 13w6days. This is the ultra sound where they take the nuchal measurement. They will also do a blood test. You will go back to the lab around week 16 to do your second blood test of the integrated screen. These three things combined will give you your probabilities Neural Tube defects such as Downs and  Trisomy 18. You can THEN decide based on your results, if you want to do further screening with the Harmony/MaterniT 21 blood test, CVS, Amnio, etc…

 

2. If I’m interested in a water birth (which I might not be a candidate for due to spine fusion), do I speak to a doula or a midwife? Are they the same thing? Do we schedule one now or later in my 3rd trimester? What exactly do they do?

 

You 100% need a midwife or an OB to see you through your pregnancy. A midwife is a trained nurse midwife, a doula is ONLY a support person for labor and sometimes pre and postnatal care. Meaning a doula helps you focus on breathing techniques, coping mechanisms, etc… A Midwife is trained to assist you throughout your pregnancy and help you give birth. if you are switching providers and you ultimately want a midwife, now is the time to find one. A dolula you can find later on, in your third trimester.

 

Make sure you are comfortable with your insurance coverage on water birth and midwives, that your hospital actually ALLOWS water births, and that they don’t have a specific list of midwives that you must see.

 

Also IDK about your hospital but at mine, you see whoever is on call during labor wether that is an OB or a Midwife (whichever you have been seeing for your prenatal care). Depending on your hospital, the person who delivers your baby may not be the person you have been seeing throughout your pg.

 

3. Does the doula/midwife work with the doctor? Will they come to a hospital if I end up needing a c-section? 

 

I am not sure about the Doula working with the midwife but I would say no. Doula’s tend to be part of a doula group, or a single person working as a Doula. In the hospital I am sure they will “work together” to get you through labor. You dont have a midwife AND an ob though, you should choose one.

 

ETA: you added a number 4, you ask your caregiver. So wether you stay with this OB or you go with a midwife, you ask that person. It seems that a midwife would be better suited to you as they spend a lot more time with each patient per visit. Also an OB won’t typically support you having a water birth as far as I know.

 

Post # 5
Member
5697 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

@quierajen:  YAY BOTHELL! I’m in Mill Creek 🙂

Post # 6
Member
545 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@atlbride2013:@atlbride2013:

1. The first trimester screening can be done between 11 and 14 weeks. I’m also 28 and chose to have a first trimester screening, even though my risk was low to begin with.

2., 3. Usually, the choice to have a waterbirth depends on where you will be delivering. This is just a generalization, but most regular hospitals don’t allow water births, however birth centers staffed by midwives do.

A doula and a midwife are different. A doula is a non-medical support person, meaning they provide you with pain management techniques, emotional support for you and your partner and remind you of the choices you made in your birth plan to help you advocate for yourself during labor and birth. They can serve a breast-feeding coach after you deliver and some may be able to come to your home to help you out in the post-partum period. I know some hospitals have doulas on staff and in that case, they work for the hospital. Where I live, doulas work independently and when you hire one, you pay them directly and they work for you. 

A midwife is a medical professional and they attend births at home, at free-standing birth centers, and at hospitals. And as such they can oversee your medical care during and after pregnancy. They are also qualified to assess the newborn after birth. During labor they can perform the same duties as an OB, administer medications and perform vaginal deliveries. If you need a c-section, generally a midwife and a doula perform the same duties, providing you with emotional support and facilitating bonding, whereas an OB is required to perform the surgery.  

In the US, most people chose to work with either a midwife or an OB, not both because here, they provide different models of care. A midwife is usually best for someone who has a low-risk pregnancy and would like to have a vaginal delivery, perhaps with no meds. An OB is good for someone who has a high-risk pregnancy and is open to having pain meds, an epidural, induced/augmented labor, or a c-section. A doula is good to have no matter who you chose to manage your care and they are generally experienced in working with moms who have either an OB or a midwife. 

Post # 9
Member
5697 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

@quierajen:  LOL well I’m ot the OP I just responded and saw that you were from Bothell 😉

I’m delivering at Prov Ev with OB’s but considering a Doula still! I thought about switching to a Midwife but I really love my OB and couldn’t stand to dump her lol. If you know of any good doula resources for snoho county I’m all ears 🙂

Post # 10
Member
898 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

@MsJ2theZ:  Oh, LOL!

My friend just had her baby there with an OB and loved it! She ended up being induced because she was 2 weeks late but she really liked her OB.

I can’t remember the Doulas that were recommended to me, since I couldn’t afford to hire one, I didn’t put it to memory. I could ask around for you though!

Post # 11
Member
5697 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

@quierajen:  Yeah it’s a great facility. I really want to deliver naturally and since I didn’t switch to a Midwife I think a Doula would be invaluable, but at the least we will attend a birth class or two and see if we think we need one.

Post # 12
Member
419 posts
Helper bee

@atlbride2013:  I would get the screen done asap and THEN switch doctors. Stay on top of them and double double double check with the U/S place that you def have an appt before 13 weeks 6 days. They should take the blood that day. Then you can look for another doctor and they can get your first set of bloods and ultrasound from this doctor and compare to your 16 week.

Post # 15
Member
1449 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

Just chiming in to say its important to choose a certified nurse midwife with hospital admitting privileges if choosing anything beside the standard obgyn care. 

ETA sorry just saw your update. Going the dual care route is the best of both worlds though. That way you are more comfortable with your obgyn if needed but also get the chance to use a midwife. Good luck!

Post # 16
Member
419 posts
Helper bee

@atlbride2013:  Well that is great! Usually your new doctor’s office would be on them to transfer records so you might not even need to worry about it. As long as you sign something possibly. 

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