Negotiating a job offer and confusion..

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Hostess
9892 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2014

I’m personally take what you can get and look for something better type person.

While you’re stil getting interviews you never know, they might not pan out (not trying to be negative but I know a lot of people go through interview after interview with no luck).

This is a job, it’s related, it’s a good starting point.  Keep looking at other options and if you find what you really want then take it 🙂

You don’t want to be unemployed 3 months from now wishing you’d taken this.

Post # 3
Member
2455 posts
Buzzing bee

confusedworkbee:  Tell them you need to think about it and ask when they need an answer by. See what you can get in the mean time. If you feel like the job market for your field is pretty good and you’ll find something fairly easily, then I wouldn’t sweat turning down a job you won’t like or get paid well for.

Post # 4
Member
535 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

Go with your gut. Its not what you wanted and even before starting you’re unsure if you will even like it. Plus, I personally would have a hard time putting my faith in a company who falsely advertised a job description.

Also, its bad ethics and detrimental to your professional reputation to job hop (quitting after a few months because you found something better).

Post # 5
Member
1902 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

Welcome to the real world.  The majority of college graduates are not doing what they expected to be doing in their first job and the job market is even tougher nowadays.  In my office, we have a temp who has been working for two years on an hourly salary with the promise of a full time position with benefits that has never come to fruition.  She finally took a full time job somewhere else, but at least now she has great job skills to bring to the table at her next position.

I agree that you should trust your gut, but I think you should also really assess whether your ideal job is actually realistic and if you should consider what skills you might gain from this job that will help you achieve your goal.

It’s incredibly tough job market for college grads, people with graduate degrees and many years of working experience all competing for the same job.  You should be pleased that you were offered a position so quickly.  If it’s truly not the right fit, go ahead and pass on it.

Post # 7
Member
3222 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2015

Trust your gut, but be realistic about your options.

Personally, if I were in your shoes, I would take this job. I gave up a really lucrative and prestigious summer associate position in NYC, thinking I would for sure get a similarly great job more in tune with my career goals in my smaller city….NOPE! When I was interviewing for that job, I had a terrible feeling about the firm culture, did not want to do corporate/commercial work, did not want to be part of a group of 70 summer associates, etc etc etc. I made a pros and cons list, and now when I look back on that document, so many of the things I listed in my cons section were idealistic. I should have sucked it up and taken the offer for the experience.

Another opportunity that is better suited to you may not come up, while you should trust your gut, also be aware that you may be stuck in your customer service position for a long time until you find another opportunity. Personally, when I was making my decision about turning down the job offer, I thought it such a top firm was offering me a job, I could definitely then get a job in a smaller center, at a smaller firm. Turns out life doesn’t work out so neatly. I’m sure it feels great to be given a full time offer before you even graduate, but these opportunities don’t come up too often.

Knowing what I now know, if I were in your shoes, I would take this position, give it a minimum of 3-6 months to build experience/prove your loyalty, then look for other positions. Leave this position for a better one with their best regards and references. 

confusedworkbee:  

Post # 8
Member
2126 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

confusedworkbee:  I took a job after leaving a previous job after college (it was a 1 year contract and that time was running out) because I felt desperate and needed a job. I knew, from the interview, that it wasn’t the right fit, and I wouldn’t like the job, but I ignored those feelings because I really, really needed a job and didn’t want to be unemployed. Looking back, I REALLY wish I had trusted my gut and had never taken the job. It was HELL. The bosses treated us like crap while expecting only the gold standard. The management were all rude, pushy and lazy, and they put all of their work onto us lowly employees. 

In the end, I stuck it out for 6 months before finding my current job. I love my job now, so I’m glad that I ended up here, but another part of me really wishes I had never taken that job and had continued looking, even if it meant I was unemployed for a period of time. 

In your case, you have a job that you enjoy. DON’T take something you KNOW you’ll hate just because you feel like you have to. You WILL regret it. Keep looking, and I’m sure something better will come along. As long as you can afford your living expenses with your current job, I wouldn’t take something you have no interest in.

Post # 9
Member
5007 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2014

confusedworkbee:  Will this job provide you with things that your current job doesnt offer? For example – retirement savings, health benefits, etc? If yes – I would take it in a heart beat. You can always spend 6 months – 1 year there and then move along to something else you’d prefer to be doing. I think this would look much better on a resume (experience in your field) than working at a job that has nothing to do with your field you’re trying to enter! 

Post # 11
Member
5192 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

confusedworkbee:  If you know you’ll dislike the work and you aren’t desperate for a job, why take it?  It sounds like you are getting lots of interviews.  Keep your options open and go after something you will be able to succeed in.  This may mean going back to the company that made the offer and seeing if they have a differnt type of job avaialble (likely if they are a large company, long shot if they are small).  If that doesn’t work turn it down and pursue your other interviews.  

Post # 11
Member
5192 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

confusedworkbee:  If you know you’ll dislike the work and you aren’t desperate for a job, why take it?  It sounds like you are getting lots of interviews.  Keep your options open and go after something you will be able to succeed in.  This may mean going back to the company that made the offer and seeing if they have a differnt type of job avaialble (likely if they are a large company, long shot if they are small).  If that doesn’t work turn it down and pursue your other interviews.  

Post # 13
Member
3200 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

When I graduated from college I accepted a position at a job doing something I wasn’t 100% happy with because it was “something.” Three months later my boss left and I was able to move up into her role. It was still not what I wanted and was basically more work, more responsibility, more of a headache. Now it’s a year later and though the money is so-so, I have been itching for something else that better suits my skills and interests. Sometimes I wished I had waited longer to find something better, but at the same time I was unemployed for about three months and nothing came along.

So, what is the moral of this little tale? It’s fine to accept something you are unsure of and isn’t exactly what you want–as long as you don’t get stuck there. Keep applying to other jobs, keep going on interviews. But if you feel like you don’t need the extra $2 an hour, stay where you are. 

Post # 14
Member
11668 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

confusedworkbee:  my opinion is happiness is more important than money when you’re established in your career. You’re just starting out and everyone suffers a little in their first job. If you want a foot in the door at this company and I. Your field then take the job and suffer for a year or two! You’re lucky to have a job In your field straight out of school. If you turn it down you might not get the opportunity to enter your field for a while. The more time that goes by without relevant experience, the less desirable of a candidate you are for positions you DO want. 

Post # 15
Member
11668 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

confusedworkbee:  also, while job hopping is not ideal, if you do it once its not a big deal. In a few years you won’t need to put this position on your resume at all (nor do you necessarily need to now if you don’t think it will help or hurt in your search).

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