New job….and I'm awful.

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
2878 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

*hugs* breathe! It was your first day!! Nobody is perfect on their first day! I truly think things will get better. 

Post # 5
Member
3210 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

Oh honey, it was your first day! No one is good at anything their first day! Seriously, give it, like, 6 months–if you’re still not feeling good about it, then maybe re-think this position. But your first day doesn’t indicate anything about YOU, at all. All it suggests is that the person who trained you wasn’t very good. Chin up! You’ve got this!!

Post # 6
Member
311 posts
Helper bee

@AllyCRN:  Lady Bird! First have a little confidence. That goes a long way! Second it was your first day cut yourself some slack and go into tonight with a fucking great attitude. Tell yourself you will get charting done earlier than last night even if just 15 minutes! Get better every night! Ask for things you aren’t sure on. Seek the advice of people who have been there longer! 

You will get better I promise! 

I had a bad day today too so I am eating Funyuns in my tub and drinking beer! I suggest you do the same!

Post # 7
Member
5542 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

First,  CNA and RNs do way different work,  I bless our techs every night because the turning and changing and such is generally much more physically difficult than the more mentally challenging work we do. The best advice I can give is figure out a schedule of when and how to do what you have to . Ours is a little different because I’m in an acute hospital but the CNAs come in, do a round of vital signs, and they finish that by doing the vitals and the most urgent things the patient needs right then,  but if it isn’t urgent,  they finish the vitals first, then chart them. Then they round and turn and fill waters and clean up patients.

The biggest thing is priority,  find out fron the other CNAs and RN what 100% must be done every time,  and do those things first. Then do the things that can wait. A patient can wait ten minutes for their cup refilled,  a patient should not waot very long if they are dirty as that can cause skin breakdown. Turning should be a priority,  we see some nasty awful bedsores because that wasn’t important at the nursing home and they end up septic fron the bedsore on their back or elbows or heels.

You can do it! I spent the first month or so of work feeling clueless and like I don’t have a clue what I am doing. Don’t be afraid to ask, much better to ask than to make mistakes. But as long as you learn from the mistake, it still isn’t the end of the world. Ask for help, nurses and nurse techs are kind of notorious for eating their young,  not that it is okay but it happens. You just have to grow and learn and ask your co-workers to explain if you don’t understand. And sometimes, the best thing is to go hide and take a few minutes to yourself to keep it together. 

Also, while my job is super hard and sometimes (frequently) thankless, you will have days and patients who nake all the insanity worth it. You can do it! Also, sorry for the novel,  night shift can sometimes be rather dull after total insanity at the begining.

Post # 8
Member
5542 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

First,  CNA and RNs do way different work,  I bless our techs every night because the turning and changing and such is generally much more physically difficult than the more mentally challenging work we do. The best advice I can give is figure out a schedule of when and how to do what you have to . Ours is a little different because I’m in an acute hospital but the CNAs come in, do a round of vital signs, and they finish that by doing the vitals and the most urgent things the patient needs right then,  but if it isn’t urgent,  they finish the vitals first, then chart them. Then they round and turn and fill waters and clean up patients.

The biggest thing is priority,  find out fron the other CNAs and RN what 100% must be done every time,  and do those things first. Then do the things that can wait. A patient can wait ten minutes for their cup refilled,  a patient should not waot very long if they are dirty as that can cause skin breakdown. Turning should be a priority,  we see some nasty awful bedsores because that wasn’t important at the nursing home and they end up septic fron the bedsore on their back or elbows or heels.

You can do it! I spent the first month or so of work feeling clueless and like I don’t have a clue what I am doing. Don’t be afraid to ask, much better to ask than to make mistakes. But as long as you learn from the mistake, it still isn’t the end of the world. Ask for help, nurses and nurse techs are kind of notorious for eating their young,  not that it is okay but it happens. You just have to grow and learn and ask your co-workers to explain if you don’t understand. And sometimes, the best thing is to go hide and take a few minutes to yourself to keep it together. 

Also, while my job is super hard and sometimes (frequently) thankless, you will have days and patients who nake all the insanity worth it. You can do it! Also, sorry for the novel,  night shift can sometimes be rather dull after total insanity at the begining.

Post # 9
Member
478 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

@AllyCRN:  I’m sorry your first day went that way, but remember, it’s you first day! Everyone makes mistakes on their first day, that’s how you learn. All medical/healthcare types of jobs are stressful. Especially in the beginning!

I work in a hospital and when I first started I had the same fears but that is completely normal. Keep in mind you are still training and that’s why you are being supervised by the RN. Thats her job right now – to watch over you and teach and train you. She’s going to be there to catch your mistakes until your ready & comfortable. Once your training is done you will be fine! 

It’s always scary at first but remember – you will do fine as long as you do your best! And it is going to take time. I agree with a PP who said to give it 6 months (sometimes even a year!) to decide whether you want to stay or not. Don’t make that decision just yet!

Good luck, you will do great!

Post # 10
Member
1355 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2013 - Vine Street Church

I was a CNA before becoming an RN, but fortunately, I was 7a-7p at my long term care facility. It was busier, but I felt like there was more support. The first few weeks were interesting, but I was assigned a specific hall with a population of 12 patients of my own, and as long as I was on that hall with my patients, everything was good. If I was floated elsewhere, it was a disaster. You’ll get used to it though — it’s just really hard at first.

Also, let me just tell you that I think everyone should be required to be a CNA prior to starting nursing school. The things I learned as a tech helped me immensely in nursing school and still help me even after almost three and a half years of practicing as an RN.

Post # 11
Member
3210 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

@AllyCRN:  I was just thinking of you this evening! Did your second day go any better? Hugs!

Post # 12
Member
435 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2010

@AllyCRN:  I could have written this when I started as a CNA… but don’t get down on yourself, it gets WAY better once you get a hang of it. 

Post # 13
Member
920 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

patience and practice and I am sure you will become better and more confident!! please let us know how day 2 of work goes. 

Post # 14
Member
11772 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: May 2013

I hope today was better for you!

Post # 15
Member
652 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

Don’t let this think that you won’t be a good RN the roles of CNA and RN are so so different. I do think that if the RN is getting after you for things that you don’t understand you should ask them. If they won’t explain it to you then they are just plain ridiculous (and not doing their job properly). 

It’s unfortunate that you didn’t get to turn your patients as much as you should of. Your patients likely didn’t get a pressure ulcer from that one night though, and you seem to know the importance of turning. Next shift, try to prioritize this given how important it is. Perhaps ask another staff member (i.e. the RN or an experience HCA what order/priority things should be done).

My friend is an RN and had a job as a CNA in a personal care home while going to nursing school and she couldn’t take it anymore it was so stressful. However, she loves being a nurse and works in acute care. So don’t write off being a nurse.

Do you have any general questions or things that you would like me to try to answer? I’ve worked in a personal care home so I may be able to help! 

 

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