NWR: Reform vs. Reconstructionist Judaism?

posted 2 years ago in Jewish
Post # 2
Member
267 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2017

I am interested also. I was raised Christian, but my fiance is Jewish and I want to incorproate as much judaism into our marriage as I can.

Post # 3
Member
1242 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2017

laschai:  The first thing you have to understand, converting to judaism isn’t easy at all. It’s not something you can wake up one day, and just decide you wanto to be jewish. Instead of trying to decide what type of jew you want to be, I would suggest learning more about the religion. Practices, customs, holidays, etc. If you decide to go forward, you will need to find a rabbi to study with, who will oversee your conversion.

Post # 5
Member
103 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

Reform:

History: founded by Isaac Wise in OH in late 1880s after formenting in Germany during Enlightenment as Jews strove to fit in with gentile larger society

G-d: G-d can be understood in many ways, everything from a traditional being who created us and communicates with us to not existing; largely left up to individual to decide 

Halakah: a part of a continuously evolving, non-binding code of rituals and ethics that each individual needs to educate themselves about in order to make personal decisions about what is meaningful to their Jewish observance

My take on communities: kinda like the Methodists or United Church of Christ of the Jewish world – people on the whole are not “observant”, value the social and community aspects, their family’s traditions adapted to modern times

 

Reconstructionist:

History: broke off from the Conservative movement in the early to mid 20th century in the US, founded by Mordechai Kaplan

G-d: G-d is not a personal being that can relate or communicate with us; G-d is the sum of all natural processes that allow people to become happy, full, whole, fulfilled; predicate G-d, not noun G-d (G-d isn’t love, but to love is G-dly) 

Halakah: not considered binding but unless you have a darn good reason for not following, you should err on the side of maintaining; community decisions of practice supported with proper education from traditional source to make informed choices

My take on communities: in level of observance, fall closer to Conservative; largely atheist, cultural, secular Jews who like to do “traditionally” Jewish things; lots of singing and music at their services; left-leaning politically; kinda hippy-ish vibe at the places I’ve been; kinda like Unitarian Universalists politically/socially with a mix of Episcopalian traditionalism

 

 

Both are very big into gender equality and equal treatment of the LGBTQ community.

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