Offended by questionairre from doctor's office (NWR)

posted 3 years ago in Wellness
  • poll: Would these questions bother you?
    Absolutely, this is NONE of their business : (65 votes)
    35 %
    It's completely reasonable for a doctor's office to ask any questions. : (66 votes)
    36 %
    Somewhere in between/not sure. : (53 votes)
    29 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    689 posts
    Busy bee

    @MariContrary:  Whoa…I’ve never seen that b4… Good for u for not answering it. Honestly, tho, if it were me, i’d look for a new doc. that’s just weird.

    Post # 4
    Member
    1134 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: December 2014

    Weird. Maybe they seeing if you are a potential liability to the insurance or something (because all those things can affect your health/life)? Is that how it works in the US?

    I’d go to a new doctor, to be honest.

    Post # 5
    Member
    715 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: January 2013

    @MariContrary:  screw that mess! I would LOVE to know their reasoning/justification behind asking those things! 

    Post # 6
    Member
    1619 posts
    Bumble bee

    Lots of pressure from medical societies to expand the definition of “public health” from infectious diseases to areas of broader social concern.   I don’t think all docs ask these questions, but many do.  If it’s a multispecialty clinic, it’s a decision made way above your particular provider’s pay grade.

    Feel free to not answer any question you don’t want to.  If they ask in the office just hold your ground and say their expanded view of what constitutes health care is not the same as yours, thanks, so you won’t be answering. 

    Post # 7
    Member
    6034 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: October 2014

    These sound like they’re coming from the insurance company, designed to assess a person’s overall health/accident risk. No carbon monoxide detectors = higher chance of illness/death if there’s a CO2 leak. Guns in the house = higher chance of gun-related injury than a gun free house (seriously no matter how carefully you store your guns, you can still hurt yourself or others with them).

    Post # 9
    Member
    4834 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

    I’ve seen the seatbelt question before a quick Google search found this in a NY Times article

    “Do you wear your seat belt? How much alcohol do you usually drink? Do you use recreational drugs? Have you ever injected yourself with anything? Do you have sexual relations, and if so, with men, women or both?

    Questions like these have long been a standard part of medical interviewing, and for good reason. The answers may reveal clues about a person’s symptoms or physical findings on exam. If a person says he or she drinks heavily or has used intravenous drugs, I may be more alert to signs of liver problems when doing the physical exam and more inclined to order certain blood tests. The answers also help me know if the patient is at greater risk for common, yet preventable, causes of death, like H.I.V., car accidents and heart disease, so that I can counsel him or her.”

    Post # 10
    Member
    1134 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: December 2014

    @Horseradish:  That’s what I was thinking but you worded it much better than I did.

    Post # 11
    Member
    3557 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: August 2014

    Ok, I could understand the insurance company asking these, but your gynecologist? Yeah, no they don’t need to know that, it’s just not relevant.

    Post # 12
    Member
    1465 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: January 2015

    They use that as a way to talk to you about mental health, and personal safety. Even though this was a gyno visit (I assume) they can still prescibe antidepressants and mood stabilizers. If you come in and mention, even off-hand, that you think you’re depressed, and also have marked that you have guns in the house, studies show that individual is at a higher risk of comitting suicide. This might not pertain to you, but it could save lives.

    Some people get so completely offended about the most inconsequential things…

    Post # 13
    Member
    689 posts
    Busy bee

    @MariContrary:  Wow, I’m returning to my regular gyno in about a month for my annual…if I get something like that i’ll freak (and post about it here lol)

    Post # 14
    Member
    2687 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: March 1996

    Personally, I wouldn’t worry about it unless you have a problem from this point. Knowing how office settings work, it’s entirely possible that that questionairre was “borrowed” from some free form website or some other office’s paperwork collection and that the person who did the borrowing is long gone and/or has never had anything to do with patient care before or since. I wouldn’t fret about it until/unless someone gives you a hard time for answering the way you did (which I don’t think was unreasonable at all.)

    Post # 15
    Hostess
    9919 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: May 2014

    @MariContrary:  smoke/carbon monoxide I could maybe understand – if you don’t and you have symptoms associated with CO poisoning that could make sense…guns?  That’s weird – a psyc appointment sure, gyno, not so much.

    Post # 16
    Member
    6034 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: October 2014

    @Eckle:  well depending on the relationship between the doctor and the insurance company, the gynecologist may be the patient’s first point of contact with the insurance company in a medical setting; so if the OP had gone to a podiatrist first, she’d be asking what these things have to do with her feet. These days in the US, many doctors work for the insurance companies or the doctors and the insurance companies all are part of the same, massive healthcare company .

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