Our new pup got spayed today, and it's killing me. =(

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
3249 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@ChellFish22:  Yes… that is the earliest I’ve ever heard of an animal being spayed.  Our cats were always closer to a year old, first.

Post # 4
Member
3618 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@ChellFish22:  What rescue told you it was a good idea to have her spayed that early?! 

Females (especially) need to get a good dose of hormones in order to develop correctly….I am so sorry your poor puppy is in pain 🙁 

Hang in their momma, she needs you!

Post # 7
Member
3618 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

@ChellFish22:  Humane society just doesn’t want “accident” puppies ending up in their shelters & rescues . Anyway, your sweet girl will be okay 🙂 

Just be patient and loving! Your happy puppy will be back as soon as she heals 🙂 

 

Post # 8
Member
7664 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

Paediatric spay and neuter is actually safer for the animals, and reduces the risk of problem behaviour later on.

@Duncan:  I don’t know about puppies, but for cats then a year is too late; you are much more likely to get problem behaviours when they are adults, and they can reproduce by the age of 5 months. I have a male cat who was a late neuter. He was about one when he was done and had already sired a litter of kittens by then. He does exhibit some problem behaviours such as territorial aggression and spraying, which is apparently down to his being a late neuter. Our other boy was done at 10 weeks and it makes a huge difference. They tend to be slower to mature and much more kittenish, but a lot less aggressive, if they are done early.

My vet says to neuter no later than 16 weeks.

Post # 9
Member
3249 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

@Rachel631:  They may have had one heat, yes, but you keep them inside until it’s over.  We have always had purebred, pedigreed persians, whose adult behaviour is predicted very well by selective breeding.  That’s among the many, many reasons I prefer pets from breeders.

I would not get a puppy or kitten from a shelter, or rescue; you don’t know what you’re getting.  If I were to get an animal from a shelter, or rescue, it would be an adult, so that I could judge its personality.

Post # 10
Member
87 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

@ChellFish22:  aww poor puppy, I hope she gets better!!

I felt the same, my cat from shelter was spayed when she was about 2 months, and she was significantly underweight. They told us to take her home and feed her and then bring back. But they just did operation and gave her to us. She was fine, she could not jump high and run fast for a couple of days. Then she got sick with high temperature, sneezing, was not eating or drinking, I was feeding her from a bottle. We went to shelter and they did a shot. After a couple of days, she was fine and became a normal kitty, very active and curious. Now she’s 2.5 years, so far so good. I wish they never spayed her, for her health and because she is very pretty (ragdoll mix)

Take care of her

Post # 11
Member
7664 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

@Duncan:  Do you have indoor cats, then? Because I was always taught they could start training to go outside around the age of 12 weeks, and then you could let them outside from 16 weeks. It makes sense to allow them out only after they have completely recovered from being neutered.

My vet still doesn’t encourage neutering after 16 weeks though… he says it’s important to neuter before the age of sexual maturity, because once those behaviours appear, they are unlikely to disappear again, even after neutering.

Having lived around a feral cat colony, I think you can definitely tell a good kitten from a dud really early on (I would say you can tell by the age of 5 weeks). You need to spend a lot of time with them though to find out. Late neuter cat is actually one of the best pets I’ve ever had… but a lot of his problems can be traced directly back to the fact that he wasn’t done early enough, and he became a fully mature male before the neuter. He also suffered a lot more during the neutering process than my other male kitten… he was miserable for about a week afterwards, whereas kitten was fine within less than a day.

icatcare says: “Traditionally male and female cats have often been neutered at six months of age, but this is after many cats reach sexual maturity and not based on any scientific rationale. For social, health and population control reasons, it is now recommended neutering should routinely take place at around 4 months of age.” [bold from the original website].

http://www.icatcare.org/advice/keeping-your-cat-healthy/neutering-your-cat

From the wiki: “Research in the 1960s proved that female animals permitted to reach sexual maturity prior to being spayed were susceptible to a higher risk of mammary cancer than those animals spayed prior to their first cycle. As a result, the recommendation was revised to perform surgeries just prior to the average anticipated age for the first cycle, 4 to 6 months for cats and 6 to 12 months for dogs.[1]

Research from the 1990s and early 2000s suggests that it is safe, and maybe even desirable, to perform sterilization surgeries prior to sexual maturity and as early as 6 weeks old.[2][3][4]

… The American Veterinary Medical Association issued a policy on Early-Age (Prepubertal) Spay/Neuter of Dogs and Cats in 1994.[6] It was revised by the AVMA Executive Board April 1999 and April 2004 and now reads as follows:

The AVMA supports the concept of early (prepubertal, 8 to 16 weeks of age) spay/neuter in dogs and cats in an effort to reduce the number of unwanted animals of these species. Just as for other veterinary medical and surgical procedures, veterinarians should use their best medical judgment in deciding at what age spay/neuter should be performed on individual animals.

… Controlled studies and anecdotal reports have addressed many of these issues:[3][4][7][10]

  1. Studies have found no significant difference in weight between cats and dogs sterilized between 6 and 14 weeks of age and those sterilized at an older age.[4]
  2. Limbs of animals sterilized at a younger age tended to continue grow for a longer period of time than those of animals sterilized later (or not at all) resulting in slightly taller individuals. There is a higher occurrence (by 2 percentage points) of dogs sterilized at an early age with hip dysplasia; however, these dogs are three times less likely to be euthanized for the condition than dogs altered at an older age so the condition suffered by the dogs sterilized at an earlier age may be less severe.[3][10]
  3. While external sexual organs of the animals who were sterilized at a younger age did not mature fully or to the same extent of those sterilized later, there was no significant negative impact on urinary tract health for most animals.[3] Male cats sterilized at a younger age experienced a lower rate of urinary tract blockage than male cats sterilized at an older age.[3] The one significant cause for concern in the studies was an increased incidence of urinary incontinence in female dogs leading to recommendations to delay spaying female dogs until 3 months of age when there is no concern about non-compliance with spay policies.[3][10]
  4. There was no evidence of increased risk of infection for cats. Cats sterilized at a younger age showed a lower incidence of gingivitis (a condition which may be associated with immune suppression) than those sterilized at an older age.[3] For dogs, there was a significant increase in the risk of parvovirus during the post-operative period for younger age patients but the researchers are not convinced that this translates into long term disposition to infection or is directly related to the nature of the procedure. It may be because dogs in shelters are at a higher risk for infectious disease and any surgery increases the risk of infection.[3]
  5. While animals sterilized at younger ages were more prone to noise phobias and sexual behaviors, other behavioral issues such as separation anxiety, escaping behaviors, inappropriate elimination when frightened, and relinquishment were decreased in the population.[10]

Post # 12
Member
23 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: August 2015

it is early to get them spayed, but humane societies often have no other choice – people end up adopting and not getting them spayed. 

Its a much more complicated healing process for the ladies as well, poor little thing. 

She’ll be okay, just keep an eye out for her stitches and any signs of infection. You sound like a very concerned mum, sounds like she’ll have a lovely home with you!

Make sure you clean her up well if she urinates on herself, and give her lots of water. If she continues to need pain meds/continues to cry out for longer than a week, then things might not be healing quite right. 

Let us know how she does! Just remember that you are doing the absolute best thing for her in the long run, and that she will heal up!

Post # 13
Member
1157 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Oh, poor baby. My parents’ puppy was kind of sad for the first night, but by the next day she was back to her usual self and we struggled to keep her quiet. She just wanted to play! She was about 4 or 5 months when we got her spayed. 

As others have said, it’s really important to get female animals spayed before the first heat. She’s in pain now, yes, but she’ll bounce back quickly and you can take comfort in the fact that you have significantly decreased her chance of cancer later in life. 

A tip- dogs are really perceptive and take a lot of cues from our emotional state. So you being upset and stressed is definitely not good for her. Try to take a deep breath and project calm and act like everything is normal. I know it’s awful to see an animal in pain, but it will be better for her if you can be calm.

Post # 14
Member
1024 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

My puppy just got neutered on Monday and I cried for him, too! He’s definitely acting fine now and it’s hard to keep him from being too playful.

Spaying is harder on them, though. Sorry to hear 🙁 She’ll be okay!

Post # 15
Member
1083 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

Aww poor pup! I do think that seems young….I’m not sure if males and females get fixed at different times but we brought our male puppy in at 4 months and that was the earliest our vet recommended. 

I would just supply lots of love and cuddles and make sure she stays clean down there. Is she wearing a cone or something to stop her from licking the stitches? When I brought my female kitten in years ago, she had to wear a cone and got so miserable because she couldn’t bathe herself. I would take it off sometimes to let her bathe and just make sure she didn’t go anywhere near the stitches.

Post # 16
Member
1056 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - Cedar Lake Cellars

@Rachel631:  Paediatric spay and neuter is actually safer for the animals, and reduces the risk of problem behaviour later on.

This!  It is actually less traumatic for your puppy now.  She will bounce back and never know what happened.

Just as others have said above, there is also less risk of cancer, sexual/gender specific behavior, and orthopedic disease if she’s spayed early.

You did the right thing and she’ll be fine before you know it.  

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