Passed over for a (teaching) job– how should I feel?

posted 1 week ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
412 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

This is life. Hold your head up high, continue to build relationships with your co-workers, be positive and polite. You don’t want them to know you’re upset about not getting the job. That just looks bad on you.

Post # 4
Member
44985 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

How should you feel?  You are free to feel however you feel. Feelings are what they are. Most of us are feel sad, disappointed, vulnerable, rejected, when we are not the successful applicant. This too shall pass.

Do you know who did get the job? Have you thought about the fact that they may have the same or better credentials, experience, references and ties to the school district?

I don’t know what your work situation is like, but here teachers are hired by the district, not the individual school.  Perhaps they have more seniority?

You really don’t have a choice but to accept the decision gracefully and carry on. As a registered nurse I have floated to cover vacancies on a ward where I applied for jobs and was passed by in favor of another candidate. Look at it as an opportunity to show that you are the right person for the next job.

Post # 5
Member
412 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2018

justwondering2015 :  Don’t be down on yourself. Like your hubby said, you never know who “beat you”. Maybe they had personal ties or just one more item on their resume that made them look just a tad bit better. Some reasons why someone else gets the job have nothing to do with the job.

Consider your options for either teaching in another school or subbing again next year. If you choose subbing, what can you do to better yourself professionally? Take some online classes? Get another certification? Even if it’s not necessarily related directly to teaching-what about CPR certification or first aid training or volunteering to help with the chess club-or whatever!!! Those things will just be more to add to your resume for next time.

Post # 6
Member
3973 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: February 1997

I am so sorry. To be approached by a principal and others about the opening and then not get the job is a blow. I really have to wonder who is upset about the decision (probably the people who approached you about it) and who held enough sway that they went with another candidate despite you being groomed for the job. Unfortunately, coaching can be such a high priority that some schools will pass over the academically more qualified candidate in order to land a great coach (not saying your school did this, but it seems possible).

I work in a rural school, and it is unlikely that they would not have hired you because they need subs. Schools ALWAYS need subs, and they won’t turn down a qualified applicant that they like in order to try to keep a sub. So I don’t think that’s it.

You are entitled to your feelings, and I would feel the same way, honestly. I, too, subbed in our building for a year and built relationships such that when my position opened up I felt confident that I would get the job. If I had not, I would have found it VERY difficult to return to subbing. However, another sub in our building (qualified for a different position from my own) was passed over for an out-of-town candidate, which was shocking. I don’t know why admin made the decision they did. She has returned to subbing, but I would have found that very hard to swallow. 

I agree that there isn’t much to be done but to brush yourself off and keep at it (subbing in your building). And then apply again when there is an opening. 

*cyber hugs* bee. I am so sorry.

Post # 7
Member
239 posts
Helper bee

That’s a hard situation to be in. Maybe it wasn’t the school itself who made the hiring decision? Here, it’s the board, not the principal or senior teachers.

As others have said, the best thing to do is go in with your head held high and keep being the best sub you can. Make use of the days you aren’t subbing to do something you enjoy, to learn something new, or to do something for your husband.

Post # 8
Member
51 posts
Worker bee

They strung you along, which is a crappy thing to do. But that’s small-town politics for you.

Post # 9
Member
1069 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2017 - The Lodge at Little Seneca Creek

I’m sorry this happened to you, but I don’t think it’s too uncommon, unfortunately. I agree with your husband that the person they hired most likely had a stronger tie to the school or to someone who works in your Central Office. When I finished student-teaching, a job opened in the school where I had student-taught. I already had a fantastic professional relationship with all of the English teachers and many other teachers at the school, the principal and English team leader had both observed me and given me very positive feedback, my mentor teacher and all of our students loved me, etc. I thought I was a shoo-in! However, they hired someone else who knew more people in Central Office than I did. I was devastated. But then I had an interview at a different school where I had done quite a bit of subbing and had a good relationship with the principal. I got that job, and I’m so thankful! I love my job (I’ve been there for 6 years), and the teacher who got the first position had a miserable first year there…so I think I made out! Maybe something even better will come your way too! Good luck!

Post # 10
Member
762 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

It’s possible that they didn’t realize you had an advanced degree they’d have to pay you more for. With only 3 years experience, Masters pay may be more than they were willing to do. Obviously it could have been something else, but that is a possibility. You also said that the interview went ‘so-so,’ and having sat on interview committees in the past, that’s a pretty big factor. Keep searching and hopefully you find a good fit somewhere else!

Post # 11
Member
464 posts
Helper bee

I am a teacher in a small town too (we only have 3 schools in our district- all 3 elementary). Jobs here are all given bc of politics. We actually had this exact thing happen to two people just this week. They thought they’d for sure get it by the way administrators had talked with them. 

Post # 12
Member
30 posts
Newbee

I’m sorry you didn’t get the job, Bee 🙁 I’m in a field where internal applicants are routinely rejected for highly coveted positions, even when someone of authority might have encouraged them strongly to apply. You have to know it’s not humiliating at all. It’s hugely disappointing, but it’s not a reflection on you being inadequate. That you were approached in advance, and that you know how good of a teacher you’ve been so far, all speak to you being a fantastic colleague and candidate. So no one will laugh at you when you come back as a sub (if they do, they probably should go back to high school themselves, where they belong). Chances are your colleagues will be sad with you and root for you next time. As you can see from all the PP’s suggestions, there could be a million reasons that are in no way under your control that you didn’t get it. Again, that you were asked to apply points to this being the case. As someone else said, hold your head up high and continue being an awesome colleague and building a history with the school and school board. It’s certainly more pleasant than worrying about people judging you, and will only add to your list of good qualities for when the next position comes up.

Post # 13
Member
2220 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

justwondering2015 :  It sucks, but as a teacher myself, I wonder if you didn’t get hired because you’re overqualified? I know that many public school districts are trying to save $$$ and due to union rules, you have to pay a teacher with a Master’s degree significantly more than a teacher with a BA. I teach in an urban area, and they really look for people with Master’s degrees, but I know that smaller towns and districts do look to cut costs by hiring people with lower base salaries. Just a thought – and something that’s totally not your fault! Keep your head up!

Post # 14
Member
44985 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

annb9 :  There is no such things as “union rules”. The Union doesn’t make the rules. The employer and the Union negotiate and agree on the terms of a collective agreement. If  they both agreed to pay more for a Master’s prepared teacher, that’s what they do.

They are not however, normally required to hire the teacher who has the best qualifications. They are required to hire someone who meets the posted requirements for the job. If the job description requires an undergraduate degree, the job will go to the teacher who has those qualifications and scores better on the other qualifications: seniority in the district, experience in teaching, interviews well etc.

Post # 15
Member
4340 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

justwondering2015 :  I know you’re upset.  I get it.  I’m a teacher too and I had been through the ringer with interviews when I first started applying to jobs.  But you really just have to move on.  Honestly I think you are too expensive.  3 years experience with a master’s?  That’s a LOT for a small district.  You are also making a lot of assumptions.  You don’t know who else applied for this job.  You also don’t know why they got the job over you.  You say here that your interview went “so-so”.  Maybe they just interviewed better.  Again, I know that you’re upset and I understand that.  Please do not make assumptions because that isn’t fair to the person who got the job.

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