Photography question

posted 3 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 2
Member
3935 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

baileyjosephine:   Assuming he is using a digital camera, he really needed to check the histogram and the LCD screen on the back to see how his exposures were and if he got the image he expected to get.  Not doing that would be a huge red flag, to me.  

I don’t know what he could mean about a lens malfunctioning – perhaps it didn’t focus as well as it should have?   Was he using a flash?   You have every right to expect your photographer to know how his or her equipment works, and if it malfunctions to be as aware as possible of the problem.  That is one of the reasons I suggest using a photographer who has a second shooter.  

 

What does he mean by “full rights”?  I doubt very much he is giving you copyright – far more likely you will have rights to print images for your personal use.  

Post # 4
Member
1072 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

baileyjosephine:  My guess is that the lens accidentally got stuck on manual focus and he didn’t notice, so all of the pictures were blurry. However it is still fairly inexcusable that all of the photos would be unusable since he should be zooming in and checking for focus on a regular basis.

For someone so inexperienced at shooting weddings, he should have a second shooter helping him and I seriously recommend you ask him to find someone decent for you. In the industry it is generally expected that any photographer should shoot a dozen or so weddings as a second photographer before shooting on their own, especially if they are charging for it. The fact that he hasn’t raises a whole bunch of red flags to me.

Post # 5
Member
4876 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

baileyjosephine:  At this point, I would just take the time to really really think about if this is someone you want photographing your wedding. Yes, malfunction happen. It’s part of technology. However, part of being a professional (which I know you mentioned he is just starting out) is the ability and knowledge to a) detect the malfunction early on, b) understand what it causing it, and c) swtich to your backup gear to remedy the situation.

The biggest red flag for me, and the reason it would be an immediate deal-breaker, is that he didn’t catch the malfunction ASAP and correct it. What happens if something like that goes wrong at your wedding and instead of it being (replaceable) engagement photos it’s your irreplaceable wedding photos? Like someone else mentioned, there are a couple of factors. His lens could have been on manual focus and he didn’t know it. Or, he was shooting with too slow of a shutter speed – thus resulting in blurry photos. Either way it shouldn’t have happened – and that kind of knowledge is what comes with expereince, and unfortunately, a higher price tag.

As for a second shooter, at the 2k price point, it’s most likely that any second shooter he hired would also be inexperienced. Mostly because at that price he doesn’t have the budget to pay the going rate, and he probably didn’t budget for it since he normally works alone. I know I personally use other full-time wedding photographers to second shoot for me….and I pay them accordingly.

Post # 6
Member
3935 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

baileyjosephine:   Was he using a tripod?  For indoor work a flash and a tripod might have prevented the problem if it was hand shake.  Or he may well have had the lens set to manual focus, ir didn’t have enough light to auto focus.  In any case I would suggest rethinking using him at all.  At your actual wedding, there will be far more distractions, the time crunch, a lot more stress on everyone.  Sounds to me as if he needs more experience as a second before going out on his own.

 

Post # 8
Member
2419 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

He sounds very inexperienced to me. Sure, he was presented with somewhat challenging conditions so far as a long, dark, staircase was concerned but he should have been constantly checking and correcting his settings. If he changed lenses then he could easily have found himself in the wrong focus mode but if you are a professional, you check this before you shoot!

To just shoot everything and come back to you with the excuse that the pictures were “blurry” is a warning sign to me. It’s certainly not professional and that’s for sure.

Post # 10
Member
2419 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

baileyjosephine:  At least, on the upside, you’ve got some good engagement pictures and discovering his shortcomings now is a whole lot better than discovering them after he’s shot your wedding!

Post # 12
Member
1072 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

baileyjosephine:  Is your wedding all outdoors? If so, then maybe it is OK to use this guy. If not, then seriously consider whether he is going to have the experience necessary to work with changing light conditions. Weddings are not as laid back as portrait shoots, things move very quickly and you have to respond to difficult light conditions constantly. If a shot is missed, it is gone and your valuable memories are not going to be repeated. Even something as simple as walking from inside your hotel room to the hall way to the lobby to outside for a ceremony can happen in three minutes and involve ten different exposure settings. If he couldn’t get one good picture in one spot after several minutes with no outside pressure at all, I would be VERY worried that he can handle the hectic pace of a wedding.

Mistakes happen even to the best of us, but if he knew what he was doing he would have been able to correct it within a couple of shots and move on. If it was a shutter speed that is too low and it wasn’t corrected the whole session, that is fairly horrifying since a wedding photographer can usually tell that kind of thing with a quick glance at the viewfinder (or even hear it when the camera clicks). How those kind of portrait sessions usually go is that you do a couple of test shots to make sure the settings are all correct, then take all the pictures you like to capture the best expressions while taking a quick peek every 5-15 shots to make sure that you’re getting the focus right. He didn’t take any test shots and he didn’t check. Weddings are another level again so if he can’t handle a portrait session I would not let him shoot your wedding on his own.

Post # 14
Member
4876 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Penang1885:  I would advise against it, regardless of the location. WAY too often I hear newbie photographers talk about taking on a wedding with no experience. The most commone thing we hear is “well I don’t know how to use flash but the wedding is outside”. Sounds great, until something happens (rain, wind, etc) causes the wedding to be moved inside. What happens then?

OP, I’m not saying the guy is terrible – we haven’t seen his pictures. I know plenty of all nautural light photogrpahers who can’t/don’t use flash that do a fantastic job at what they do. That being said, they are NOT wedding photographers because it’s just a totally different ballgame. Wedding photography is a different animal – it’s fast paced, highly stressful, constantly changing, and you have to be 100% “on” at all times. It’s all about managing expectations. If you look at what you see and like his work, you’ll probably be fine. If you look at it and you aren’t completely confidant, you’re going to continue to question your decision.

 

Post # 15
Member
213 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

When in doubt, walk away…. never trust an amateur to do an pros job.  You will only get married once, and those moments cannot be repeated… I would walk away if I were you!

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