Physician receptionist job

posted 2 years ago in Career
Post # 2
42182 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

FutureMrsB123:  Never let your perceived lack of qualifications stop you from applying for a job.

You never know what emphasis they are going to place on which qualifications.

You also never know who else is going to apply.

In this case the lack of medical experience may be a hindrance, if they want that experience to include familiarity with medical terminology or any special appointment booking system.

Post # 4
1107 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2015

FutureMrsB123:  Before I worked in a front office for a physician practice…I waitressed, worked at Walmart’s Tire Center desk, worked as a QA person in a juice factory…and many other …odd jobs. Customer service is a big deal for jobs like that. I think if you did well waitressing, you’ll do fine in front office. I had so many different jobs and all of them actually just seasoned me for what I’m doing now. I work for the same hospital I was a receptionist for, but in Information Services and I am an analyst that basically roams the hospital and helps out with EVERYTHING! It’s pretty cool. Just own it and know you can handle it, I’m sure it can take you far! Good luck!

Post # 6
1107 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2015

FutureMrsB123:  Just be confident. It’s not as big and scarey as you imagine. (I always imagine new jobs to be like that, then I get to them and become pro and boss others around!) Hospital is a prime place for a job because they usually pretty awesome benefits!

Post # 7
357 posts
Helper bee

FutureMrsB123:  hope you get the job, and somehow maybe it will be a great way to get into a really stable field. 

Like someone says, you might to have slight medical knowledge. Doesnt hurt to learn some basics on your own. Like if someone comes in with certain symptoms, you might need to be able to recognize if it’s urgent to talk to a doctor and have the doctor see them right away. 

Post # 11
560 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

I work in a similar job to what you’re describing and I didn’t have any office experience. Although I did have a college degree (which has nothing to do with my job-yay), all of my previous work experience was hosting/waitressing so I think I was in similar position as you. The bank job counts as office experience. I would say the most important skill for being a physician’s receptionist is to multitask. After that, to stay cool under pressure. I think you should also emphasize that you’re looking for a stable, long term position because offices like that get a LOT of turnover and it sucks for the manager having to deal with it. All they want is a normal person to be nice and come into work everyday haha. I hope you get the job!

Post # 12
9526 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

Former waitress who now works at a hospital here – I think waitressing could actually have some similar things. Generally being nice and polite to people. Patients can be kind of nuts when they call the doctor (they’re sick, their kid is  sick, they’re frustrated with insurance, etc.) so it’s good to be able to keep calm and polite. 

Post # 13
1891 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

Not much to add, other than good luck! I have done that type of work before, and I am sure that you will do fine. They will need a reliable and friendly person. The customer is always right, but you already know that. Apply for anything you can, and let the HR people do what they do best. 

Post # 14
1049 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

As someone who has had to hire people in the past, I figured I’d give you some tips.

Firstly, if you know anyone in a corporate position who regular hires employees, ask them to read over your resume and give you tips.  The more people you ask the better.  Your resume is the single most important thing, not just what is written on it, but how it’s presented.  A few years agom, I was job hunting for months and got nothing, changed my resume around and got 3 job interviews in a week.  

Always right a brief cover letter for each application, and customise it to the position you are applying for.  Mention the company by name and do some research about what the company does (eg. they specialise in something) and mention you are particularly interested in that field of their work.  It shows you are taking the time to apply and not just sending your resume out to any opening you see.  

When possible, do a follow up call or email (as it seems you’ve been doing) to check they received it.  In the email/phone call ask a quick intelligent question about something on the ad.  It shows you really read it and absorbed it.

These sorts of steps really show someone you are interested in the position and can overstep missing certain skills/experiences they have asked for, depending on the importance they have placed on that skill/experience.

Good luck!  If not this one, there will be another one!

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