PLEASE HELP ME!! Wedding Invitation Wording!!!

posted 2 years ago in Ceremony
Post # 2
Member
935 posts
Busy bee

I think there should be an “and” or amperstand between your parents names. 

Post # 3
Member
1902 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

No.  The “and” would imply that your parents are still a couple.

I would remove the “on” in front of Saturday, the fourth of October, the “and” from Two thousand fourteen, and the “at” from at one o’clock in the afternoon

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 4 months ago by  .
Post # 5
Member
1902 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

Correct.

Post # 6
Member
935 posts
Busy bee

I wouldnt read it like that, but I guess that makes sense being that the mother still uses the married name. I only would infer they were together if it was Mr and Mrs dads first name last name. 

louisianablue:  

Post # 7
Member
54 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

It should be Ms., not Mrs., for your mom if she isn’t married, at least I think so!

 

Post # 8
Member
73 posts
Worker bee

“Honour” is the British spelling; “honor” is more common in the USA. It’s kind of like “theater” vs. “theatre” – the British one is OK if you want a really formal style.

Post # 9
Member
4 posts
Wannabee

Chiming in to say that I would agree that it should be Ms. if your mom isn’t married, and to confirm that you did it right with no “and” between your parents’ names, which should indeed be on separate lines. There’s a good page about it here: http://www.minted.com/wedding-planning/wedding-invitation-wording

I had to research this when I was putting together http://www.MyWeddingReminders.com – a new, free email reminder tool. 🙂

Post # 11
Member
4 posts
Wannabee

You’re welcome! Also…like, there may be varying rules of formal etiquette, but at the end of the day, you have to go with what will make the most sense to convey your meaning to the most people. 🙂 

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