PLEASE post pics of yellowing white gold vs tarnished silver

posted 2 years ago in Rings
Post # 2
Member
1517 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

I don’t have a pic but I had my ering remade into 19K from 18K so it wouldn’t yellow. The hue of 18K was buttery soft and not visually worrisome, but I wanted the colour to be white. I would be cautious of silver – it isn’t as durable as white gold and sizing it could be a problem down the line. 

Post # 3
Member
1298 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

wouldn’t daily wear of the silver prevent tarnishing? 

Post # 5
Member
4944 posts
Honey bee

Jako:  I think that wearing a silver ring daily will prevent it from tarnishing. I wore silver wedding bands (alone, without an “ERing”) for about 15 or 16 years, and I never had one of them tarnish while I was wearing it regularly. Now, when I took them off and put them away to switch between different styles, they tarnished — even in my jewelry box.

If you like the look of tarnish against a silver or white metal, maybe you could check into whether or not a jeweler could oxidize some of the nooks and crannies on your band. I’m sure they could do this with silver. Probably other metals, too. I don’t know if it works with white gold, though.

Post # 6
Member
5228 posts
Bee Keeper

Jako:  I have a white gold ering and a yellow gold band. The ering is still obviously white gold, but it is definately looking buttery, especially next to my yellow gold ering. The pic also shows my husband’s yellow and white gold wedding band. The white gold of his ring is looking worn too. I actually love the look!

Not sure how well you can see it in these pics:

Post # 7
Member
5228 posts
Bee Keeper

Jako:  Also, I think the tarnished look you want you can get with white gold:

This one makes me drool a ‘bit:

 

 

Post # 9
Member
2225 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 1987

18k gold is actually creamy in colour.  Jewellers rhodium plate 18k white gold rings so they look white.  The white gold doesn’t yellow with time.  It is simply that the thin layer of rhodium wears off.  

I’ve seen unplated white gold rings and they are really attractive.  Unplated white gold tends to be used in designer rings.

However, if you go for this option then choose an alloy that does not have a high proportion of nickel (some people are allergic to nickel).  Also, if you do lots of swimming in chlorinated swimming pools you might be better choosing yellow gold or platinum, or not wearing your ring while swimming.  This is because the other metals in white gold alloy can react with the chlorine.

 

Post # 10
Member
4411 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 2010

Supersleuth:  Actually, the chlorine will pit any gold, not just white gold.  Platinum and silver are not affected by chlorine.  

Post # 11
Member
2225 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 1987

Loribeth:  Thanks Loribeth.

It’s the alloys and not the gold that react with the chlorine.  So yes chlorine affects both yellow and white gold’s alloys.  The higher the karat the less the jewellery will be affected.  Pure gold would be unaffected.  

Silver jewellery does react with the chlorine, if the internet is to be believed.  

 

Post # 12
Member
636 posts
Busy bee

Jako:  wow, I LOVE the ring you posted! So beautiful! 

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