potty training a 2 a half year old daschund

posted 2 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
293 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

Read up on crate training her. We just got a puppy (9 weeks old today) and we are crate training her. You’ll need a crate that is just big enough for her to turn around in and lay down. You don’t want too big or she’ll sleep on one side and use the other side as a bathroom spot.

Essentially keep her in the crate and EVERYTIME you take her out, before you do anything else with her, take her outside to go potty. When you’re heading outside tell her “let’s go OUTSIDE to go POTTY”. When she goes potty outside praise her…a lot. Let he know she did a good job going potty outside. Then feed her or play with her. Give her a treat in the crate when you put her back in..so she’ll learn her crate is a good spot. She will spend quite a bit of time in her crate but as she learns to only go potty outside you’ll be able to keep her out of her crate for longer periods of time; eventually, keeping her out all the time. Her crate will become her “safe spot”, “sanctuary”…”home away from home”, and she’ll go in it on her own accord.

Dogs will associate the crate with a den, naturally dogs won’t want to go to the bathroom where they sleep (their den). If she has an accident in the house (or in her crate) tell her no and immediately take her outside. I keep a pair of easy slip on shoes right by the door. It’s a lot of work but worth it in the end. You don’t want to regret her because she is going to the bathroom in the house. Also, don’t use her crate as punishment. If she does something bad tell her no and correct her behavior. You don’t want the crate to be a prison cell. 

Post # 3
Member
1619 posts
Bumble bee

Dachshunds can be tough with house training, and unfortunately she’s developed some bad habits so you’re going to have to take the time  and be consistent enough to create new ones.

I agree with PP about crate training.  I know you’re busy with a toddler, but I think it may help  to take her outside on a leash rather than just letting her out with your other dog.  That means you can make sure she does her business and doesn’t  just sniff around.  Also, acting like you’re a crazy lady amounts of praise at the moment she does her business outside. Crate training is a great method, because it boils down to you have the dog in a space where they are unlikely to soil unless you are actively watching the dog so that you can immediately take them outside when you see their cues they’re getting ready to potty.    I went to one seminar where the trainer suggested that another method was to secure their leash to your belt loop.  Yes, it’s annoying but it keeps them from sneaking off and making a mess when you get distracted for a moment (as you will with your child).  Basically it ‘s schedules, consistency and setting them up for success.  

Post # 4
Member
3661 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

DiamondnLovey:  Dachshunds are nototiously difficult to train. It’s their stubborn nature. Does she go to the bathroom outside when you do let her out or does she save it for inside? My dachshund refused to go outside at all but would go on the carpet as soon as he got back inside. I trained him to use a fake grass potty pad. At least it’s confined to an area that way and he always has access to it if he has to potty and its easy to clean up. He does pee outside now (that happened once he got his instinct to start marking his territory), but he’s 2 years old and still refuses to poop outside. I even had him staying with my parents dogs to try to get him to start popping outside and he would still hold it and wait until he was inside. I never had any luck with the crate either. He would just keep peeing in the crate.

Post # 6
Member
1990 posts
Buzzing bee

Try crate training – making sure it’s large enough she can lay down comfortably, but small enough she won’t find a corner to relieve herself in. If you can’t keep your eyes on her AT ALL TIMES, then she’s in the crate. When she is out, tie her to your waist or a table in the same room as you, so you can watch for signs that she is going to go potty. She probably gets anxious, sniffs around a bit all the sudden. Wait for that sign, and THEN take her out. Taking her out often doesn’t teach a relationship between outside = potty time. You have to wait until she actually needs to go. It’s also very helpful to catch her in the act itself – clap your hands, pick her up, and take her outside immediately to finish her business. Then praise like you’re a crazy person 🙂 That way she can have a real example of the desired behavior.<br />

Post # 7
Member
4794 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

DiamondnLovey:  Doxies are hard to potty train. I have one that’s supposedly part doxie and he still has troubles. I wouldn’t confine him to a crate while you are home. It IS something you have to be super diligent about, at least I’ve noticed with my dog. Can you at least put a pee pad down so he goes on that if he has to? When he goes outside, do you make a big deal about it and praise him like he just won the gold in the olympics? MIne has slowly started to get better. I see him walking towards the back door and he’ll look back at me. so that’s been my latest cue. Good luck!

Post # 8
Member
3661 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

DiamondnLovey:  Well at least you have that going for you. If she’s peeing outside and still peeing in the house, then maybe you should try training her to go on a pad when she has to go in between potty breaks. They have very little bladders and have to pee a lot. That’s another reason that I trained mine to use a potty pad while I’m gone, because he really can’t hold it very long, even as an adult. 

Post # 10
Member
3661 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

DiamondnLovey:  Basically. I started with just plain puppy pads and he took to them pretty quickly. Usually they are scented in a way that attracts them to pee there, but if he had an accident, I would wipe up some of the pee onto the pad to further attact him to go there. My dachshund then decided a couple times that he wanted to rip up the pads, so I switched to a fake grass pee pad (like below) that has a tray underneath to collect the pee, I just stick a regular pee pad under the grass though for easier clean up. 

Post # 12
Member
2565 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

When she pees in the house is she actively squatting to go or is she just dripping pee or peeing the bed when she sleeps?  If she is peeing 4 times a day when you take her outside and still having accidents in the house it might be a good idea to have her checked out for a medical condition before assuming she just isn’t housebroken.  I wouldn’t limit her water intake until you confirm there is no underlying medical condition first.

Post # 14
Member
495 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

You should not in anyway limit a dogs water intake. I get this question a lot at work.(vet tech) You need an enzyme spray to clean up or she will keep doing it in the same spots over and over. It’s a simple reward system, eveytime you catch her peeing pick her up and put her outside. She needs to go out in the morning, after meals, after exercise, before bed, after drinking (if you catch her) after any nap, and when she starts sniffing around. It’s super important that you do not tell her off when you find a puddle in the house, she will not link your anger with peeing in the house, she will just link it with peeing and start to do it in places you won’t see. Only tell her no when you catch her in the act. Treats or cuddles if she is not a food driven dog, when she goes outside. Lots of perseverance, i have 2 rescue Chihuahuas that were not potty trained. Smaller dogs are the hardest to potty train.

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