PSA: You are invited to the wedding, not the marriage!

posted 3 years ago in Paper
  • poll: how did you word your invitation?
    marriage : (24 votes)
    49 %
    wedding : (20 votes)
    41 %
    other : (5 votes)
    10 %
  • Post # 3
    Member
    2052 posts
    Buzzing bee

    @gingerkitten:  I think you’re splitting hairs here. 

    The definition of marriage is the formal union of two people. While the word also encompasses the whole relationship, witnessing the marriage of two people doesnt necessarily mean watching the whole thing. 

    You can have a marriage without a wedding. And by law in most states you need witnesses for that. Those people are witnessing a marriage, not a wedding. 

    Post # 4
    Member
    130 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: October 2014

    hmm…but “marriage ceremony” is certainly correct. And if you think of the word “marriage” as a verb–which it is  (e.g. the merger of two entities)– it’s perfectly grammatical. 

    Post # 5
    Member
    6504 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: June 2013

    mar·riage

    : the relationship that exists between a husband and a wife

    : a similar relationship between people of the same sex

    : a ceremony in which two people are married to each other

    Per the Merriam-Webster dictionary

    Post # 6
    Member
    2474 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    From Google:

    mar·riage
     
    noun: marriage; plural noun: marriages

    1. 1.
      the formal union of a man and a woman, typically recognized by law, by which they become husband and wife.
      “a happy marriage”

      synonyms:

      wedding, wedding ceremony, marriage ceremony, nuptials, union

     

    🙂

    Post # 8
    Member
    3693 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    I think it’s just you. Every wedding invitation I’ve ever seen, including my own, said “marriage.” If you want to get super traditional, Emily Post even suggests that wording. http://www.emilypost.com/weddings/wedding-invitations-and-announcements/337-formal-wedding-invitation-variations-and-samples

    The first definition of marriage listed from Google is the union, not the state of marriage. Two alternate definitions.

    Post # 9
    Member
    610 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: September 2015

    Haha I thought this thread was going to be about “I know you were invited to my wedding, but please stop giving me advice about my marriage.” (See also: Many recent in-law threads.)

    I haven’t written any invitations yet, but I prefer the “wedding” wording.

    Post # 10
    Member
    42460 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: November 1999

    @gingerkitten:  Seems pretty common to me:

    Standard Traditional Wedding Invitation Wording:
    Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Myers
    request the honor of your presence
    at the marriage of their daughter
    Anne Catherine
    to
    Theodore Joseph Johnson
    at the Newport Beach Club
    Saturday, the Seventeenth of June
    Eight o’clock in the evening

    Both sets of parents are funding the wedding:
    Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Myers
    and
    Mr. and Mrs. Kwame Johnson
    request the honor of your presence
    at the marriage of their children
    Anne Catherine and Theodore Joseph
    etc.

    If bride’s parents are hosting, but would like to include grooms parents on the invitation
    Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Myers
    request the honor of your presence
    at the marriage of their daughter
    Anne Catherine
    to Theodore Joseph Johnson
    son of Mr. and Mrs. Kwame Johnson
    etc.

    Post # 11
    Member
    222 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2010 - Christmas Tree Farm

    @gingerkitten:  But formally, it’s grammatically correct. Many people like to use traditional, formal wording for their invitations.

    Post # 12
    Member
    207 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: March 2014

    @gingerkitten:  agree with @a_day_at_the_fair! One of the definitions of “marriage” is “a ceremony in which two people are married to each other.” Yes, it also means the relationship that exists between two people, but guests can very well celebrate, witness, be invited to, participate in, and enjoy someone else’s marriage!

    In my opinion, “marriage” is the ceremony, and “wedding” is the whole shindig (ceremony, cocktail hour, reception, and so on). 

     

    Post # 13
    Member
    4043 posts
    Honey bee

    @gingerkitten:  Well, the definition of marriage is…the formal union of a man and a woman, typically recognized by law, by which they become husband and wife. So I guess it could be interpreted as you are inviting people to the “union” part.

    Anywho, we used the wording: “Mr. & Mrs. (my former last name) and Ms. (husband’s last name) invite to a joyful celebration of love as Bmo88 and (my husband) exchange vows and say I do.” We had very modern, somewhat casual invites though.

    Post # 15
    Member
    120 posts
    Blushing bee
    • Wedding: June 2013

    Hahaha!  I also thought this was going to be about people butting in to your marriage.  It’s funny how wording sets us off on the wrong foot sometimes.  I had to go back and look at our invites.  Ours said, “Invite you to celebrate and share in the joy of their wedding.”  Whew.  Wink

    Post # 16
    Member
    2052 posts
    Buzzing bee

    @gingerkitten:  but as @RedHairing said, “marriage ceremony” is correct, so its just a shortened version of that. 

    Just because you don’t like it, doesn’t mean it isn’t correct or doesn’t make sense. The word hasn’t changed meaning at all, its just a word that has more than one meaning. At a wedding, you’re getting married, so why would people witnessing your marriage be incorrect or not make sense?

    Leave a comment


    Sent weekly. You may unsubscribe at any time.

    Find Amazing Vendors