Pumping but not breast feeding.

posted 3 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@figgnewton:  I intended to do this right from the get go. I don’t like the idea of breast feeding (and I am telling you this because I like you, even though I am going to get blasted), but I do like the benefits of it. My compromise is to pump, and I will do that from the first day. You are being practical – you have to go back to work, so what else are you supposed to do? Run back and forth between home and work? I’m sure your boss would LOVE that 😛

Don’t feel bad about it. You’re a good mom.

 

Post # 4
Member
4212 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I’m with you both. I may feel differently in the future, but as I feel now, I would not feel comfortable breast feeding. I prefer the idea of pumping. I know breast milk is best if you are lucky enough to be able to produce it. Like many other things, I don’t think that your choices are anyones buisness and the only person who’s opinion matters is your own. 

Post # 7
Member
4413 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

DH and I were just talking about this yesterday. My biggest concern is building and keeping my supply, so I want to do whatever is going to best help me avoid drying up and having to spend money on formula! But also what is going to be the most convenient — for example, for middle-of-the-night feedings, is it easier to feed from the breast or the bottle? So I’m mostly just commenting to follow and hear what other momma bees have done.

I definitely plan on renting a hospital pump for a few weeks right away though, since I hear that is the best way to build up a supply. They are mighty, and once I get a good supply going, then switching to my Medela pump should hopefully be okay!

Post # 8
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@iarebridezilla:  Okay, obviously I have no kids because I have to ask this question. What do you mean, building your supply? Doesn’t it just…come?

Post # 9
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@figgnewton:  Exactly, it allows you to share parental responsibilities a little more evenly, and allows hubby some bonding time too. You obviously care because you’re asking and I’m glad you are doing what’s best for your baby and yourselves 🙂

Post # 10
Member
2884 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

i dont get why anyone would be against that really. the main issue is nutrition…and if the breast milk is getting there one way or another i dont see why people care how it gets there

if possible im going to try to stockpile milk by pumping and breastfeeding so i can stop sooner

Post # 11
Member
2884 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

@MrsPanda99:  the more you pump/feed the more you produce. if you reduce the number of times you are expressing milk then you will have less milk to express

if you pump and breastfeed then youll produce enough to supply an increased demand

Post # 12
Member
753 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

Some people have difficulty building and maintaining a milk supply solely through pumping. However, there are resources out there to help. 

While you are breastfeeding for the first month, you can definitely take the opportunity to build up your milk supply and have a lot frozen, on hand…that way you have some fallback if pumping isn’t producing quite as much milk as you need. 

This website doesn’t look to be the most professional, but there is some great information… http://www.mother-2-mother.com/ExclusivePumping.htm

Don’t let anyone judge your choices. I just think it’s great that you’re providing your baby with breastmilk!!!!!

Post # 13
Member
3635 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I know several mothers who pump and bottle feed.  Personally I think as long as you’re making an effort to feed your baby breastmilk and not just saying “that’s gross, he/she can have formula” you’re doing just fine.  They still get all the benefit and if it works for you – cool.  One mom was just weirded out by the idea and one swears middle of the night it’s easier to pump and hand it to her husband and go back to sleep.  Her sister says she’s crazy and it’s way easier to nurse baby back to sleep (but, she co-slept).  You can nurse laying down so I don’t see how pumping, washing everything, then bottle feeding is easier that just nursing at 3am, but some swear it is.

Post # 14
Member
6644 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Take this with a grain of salt, I had a hard time BF and tried to pump solely. It did not work because my body didnt understand there was no baby making demands.  And I was pumping every 2 hours.  I had to pump since my son was in NCIU for first month of life.  Your body prodcues what the baby eats, so it really is a supply and demand. 

 

Post # 15
Member
359 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2005

I’d suggest that you keep yourself open to all options.  A baby suckling has a much greater ability to stimulate milk letdown than a pump, at least for some people.  I would hate for you to think you “can’t” produce milk just because you won’t give it up for the pump and won’t let the baby try.

I always intended to breast feed, but I also wanted to pump and set aside a supply so dad could do some feedings.  What I found was that my body will not lactate for a home grade pump.  I could have milk *dripping* out, then hook up the pump and get a few drops that would dry up immediately.  I tried a hospital grade pump during a hospitalization, and that worked pretty well, but was still nowhere near as efficient (or as comfortable) as my baby.

It can be hard to keep your supply up with just pumping, so it seems like you should take advantage of that first month to get your supply as established as possible.  If a pump does it for you, great, but maybe try to warm yourself up to the fact that it might not so that you can be open to letting baby nurse as well.

Not gonna lie, it is a little sad to me to hear about this, because nursing is such a sweet, intimate, cuddly way to bond with baby; but you have to do what you’re comfortable with.

Post # 16
Member
1734 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 1998

I intend to solely pump. That means several other folks can also do feeding if/when I need time to relax. Milk for on the go if/when someone needs to baby-sit.

I get the importance of bonding with your baby physically during feeding, and don’t get me wrong, there are down sides to solely pumping. It’s dawned on me that I’ll need storage bags and lots of bottles. This is where a dishwasher or bottle sanitizer really comes in handy. If you can pop them in there periodically, problem solved with all the hassle.

 

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