Question about Catholic baptism when the mother is agnostic/atheist.

posted 3 years ago in Catholic
Post # 3
Member
2873 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

Yes, these classes are required.  I can’t tell you much because I haven’t been through them, but there are a ton of websites for this.  As long as you can agree with allowing your husband raise your kids Catholic, they should have no problem with your faith.  The Catholic church much rahter have your kids baptised than not baptised. 

 

Post # 4
Member
108 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

We only had to do one “class” that was bascially just a rehearsal of the ceremony. So, I would say that it varies by diocese and parish. I don’t remember having to do or say anything that directly said I was agreeing with catholicism (apart from being there in the first place). I would check the website of your parish to see what they require. Catholics are allowed to marry non-catholics, so the church would not make a hindu or jewish parent say anything that goes against their beliefs at the baptism. 

Post # 6
Member
2368 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

My Mom is Shinto, and my Dad was Catholic. I was baptized as Catholic, and they had no issue with it. I’ll be honest, my Dad was an EastMas catholic at best, so he wasn’t actively involved in the classes. At best, they smiled and nodded through the whole thing. 

Post # 5
Member
1400 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Catholics are allowed to marry non-Catholics, but technically they’re only allowed to marry Baptized Christians, so theoretically, both parents should believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

I don’t have anything helpful to add, I was raised Greek Orthodox which has some similar rules on who you’re allowed to marry, so I’m not allowed to marry my Jewish fiance in the church, but I don’t want to get married in the church or baptise my children.

Post # 7
Member
333 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2010

hollyberry4:  It depends on the parish.  Our parish did require classes, but the parish I used to belong to had no adult classes in the faith of any kind.  Basically, at our parish, there is a Catholicism 101 course that is three sessions.  While those in RCIA have to be involved in more instruction than that, the class fits that partial obligation.  It’s also required for anyone getting married and when an infant was baptized.  That said, I graduated from a Catholic University with a reputation for being very orthodox, so they waived the requirement for us. 

You would have to ask the parish about the content of the class and whether one parent attending suffices.

Post # 8
Member
479 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

You sound just like me and my FI.  I had no idea this was even a requirement.  I don’t expect it will be much of a problem, since you already had to promise during the wedding to raise the kiddos Catholic anyway. I was baptized Catholic and my mom is Protestant so I know there was no issue there.  

 

As an aside…It does bother me that in the church’s eyes I am Catholic just because I was baptized as a baby…I literally never went to church as a kid and I don’t believe in it but they consider me Catholic anyway! Oh well.  Like you I told FI he gets to raise any kids of ours in the church, but when they are old enough they get to decide their own beliefs even if it means they won’t keep going to church.

Post # 10
Member
479 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

hollyberry4:  Yes, being baptized certainly has made it a bit more straightforward to get married in the church, but I certianly find the whole fact that something my parents had done for me when I was two months old can have any bearing on my religious affiliation, regardless of the fact that I don’t believe it!

As for first communion I don’t know yet…since we’re not married yet and obviosly not TTC we haven’t talked about a specific age when we feel they will be old enough to say they do or don’t want to continue.  I’m guessing they will probably do first communion and then decide before confirmation if it’s something they want to commit to.  I figure if the church feels kids are ready at that age to make that commitment then it’s also a fair age to say they can make their own decision on the matter.  Have you and your DH worked out those details yet?

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