Question about Hashimoto's

posted 2 years ago in Wellness
Post # 2
Member
145 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

Have theymeasured your T4 levels? 

 

Post # 3
Member
145 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

Or anti-thyroid peroxidase levels? Usually in the disease you will have decreased level of T4 and increased levels of TSH, but other factors can falsely lower TSH levels so they shouldn’t be examined without T4.

Post # 4
Member
45 posts
Newbee

I am a doctor (not an endocrinologist, but I feel like I know enough about the condition). You do not have to have hypothyroidism to be diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. Hashimoto’s can CAUSE hypothyroidism. Hashimoto’s is actually an immunodeficiency disorder, therefore it is way more common to have hypothyroidism than the disorder. As a PP mentioned, in Hashimoto’s your TSH levels will almost always be elevated as other glands in your body are rapidly trying to balance your hormone levels out. And having a nodule, or even a goiter, is super super common. They can be heriditary and unless they are rapidly changing in size or painful they can likely be ignored the best you can.

Post # 5
Member
271 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

ImaStarr:  Like pp said you do not need to have hypothyroidism to be diagnosed with Hashimotos. Hashimotos commonly causes hypo/hyperthyroidism, but this doesn’t always present in everyone. My current endocrinologist told me that Hashimotos can be difficult to treat because of this. I was presrcibed Levothyroxine because when I was first diagnosed only my TSH was tested and it was elevated. I was still feeling lousy and was diagnosed by another doctor after they tested my antibody levels. I would assume they may put you on a lose dose of something, as I was told it stops/slows damage that the antibodies cause to the thyroid. 

Doctors all treat Hashimotos differently, some treat by lab levels, some treat by how the patient feels. So you may have to shop doctors before you find one you like. It took me 6 doctors, but I finally have one who has been really awesome. Good luck!

Post # 7
Member
1084 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

ImaStarr:  Have you had your sonogram yet? Like others have mentioned, one can have Hashi’s with or without any symptoms. Similar to you, I knew something was going on with me for a while and then I finally found out about my hypothyroidism and then my Hashimoto’s.

I was feeling super crappy for a while, but I finally went in to the doc after I went to lift my 60lb dog into our car (usually not an issue for me) and I almost dropped her because I was feeling so weak. I tend to have random bouts of petechiae pop up (tiny, pin-point sized red dots on/under my skin) and the doctor was concerned about the current petechiae combined with my other symptoms so she sent me for immediate blood work.

Well, the blood work came back looking pretty great with the exception of my TSH levels being just slightly high (indicative of hypothyroidism), so she gave me the “option” to either re-test in a few months to see if my levels change again or start taking a small dosage of Levothyroxine immediately to try and regulate things. I said I’d start the meds because I was sick of feeling so icky all of the time and I’d do anything to help. That was earlier this year and while I do feel a bit better, I still don’t feel great. I’m due for more blood work soon so it’s possible that we still have a bit more adjusting to do.

Recently, I had my annual women’s appointment and my Gyno felt a thyroid nodule during my neck exam, so she had me get a thyroid ultrasound to be safe. The ultrasound revealed Hashimoto’s, with an enlarged thyroid but no suspicious or dominant nodules (yay!), so she is referring me to an endocrinologist for monitoring and recommended blood work every 6mos. I’m still waiting to hear back about an appointment with the endocrinologist.

It’s nice to know there’s a medical reason for feeling so awful all the time, but also frustrating to have to deal with balancing and monitoring things all the time. I hope you already have or will have the answers you’re looking for shortly! 

Post # 8
Member
1791 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

ImaStarr:  I have Hashimotos and when they tested my TSH levels they came back almost normal, but with antibodies present. My sonogram showed a few nodules (but none that look suspicious) and my thyroid was clearly ”being attacked by my immune system”, whatever that means. I take thyroxine and have to go for a check-up and blood tests every 6 months, for the rest of my life. Since taking the thyroxine, I feel amazing – my energy has come back and all my weird headaches, joint pain and fatigue has gone. I still had antibodies present on my last check-up, but less than when they diagnosed it. Apparently the antibodies should go back to normal over time if I continue to take the medication. 

Post # 9
Member
1791 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Oh and to answer your question – if your thyroid levels are normal but your body is producing antibodies, they could recomment a low-level dose of thyroxine. However it really depends what level of the spectrum your thyroid levels are at – if they’re normal but bordering on hypothyroidism, you could take 25mg of thyroxine and that should be enough to give you your energy back. But taking too much thyroxine can be dangerous to your heart and send your thyroid levels into the ”hyperthyroidism” zone, so if your thyroid levels are nowhere near hypothyroidism, they probably won’t give you any medication. But.. I’m not a doctor.. Is the doctor you’re seeing a GP or an endocrinologist? I’d make sure you get an appointment with an endocrinologist (thyroid specialist).

Post # 10
Member
1791 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Also, stay away from refined sugar, which makes your body produce adrenaline and cortisol (so cut back on chocolate and sweets, etc.. ) and taking vitamin B supplements has also really helped me. 

Post # 11
Member
1084 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

amanda3334455:  How long did it take for you to start feeling good again? Some of my symptoms have lifted, but not all of them. I don’t wake up feeling completely exhausted anymore, but my joint aches/pains, general weakness, and “brain fog” don’t seem much better. I’m looking forward to my next blood work so that we can find out more/if I need to adjust my Levo more. 

Post # 12
Member
1791 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

indyJEEP:  It actually took about 2 months… at first I felt hyper-active for 2 weeks and my heart was beating a lot in the evenings, and then I felt pretty much the same as before – tired, lethargic, brain fog… I checked with my Dr. and she said it takes up to 2 months for the hormone to build up in your system and for your body to start responding to the tablets correctly… and then after about 6 weeks I noticed I had more energy, and another 2-3 weeks later I felt really energetic and different. So, depending on how long  you’ve been taking the stuff, I would wait a bit and it will kick in 🙂

Post # 13
Member
480 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I have it as well. Everything showed/stull shows normal except for antibodies and some nodules. I’ve been taking Thyroxine since 2011. A normal level of tsh doesn’t necessarely mean you don’t have it. I hope they gave you medication, OP. If not, try another doctor. Good luck! 

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