Question re diamond marketing and its influence

posted 2 years ago in Rings
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  • Post # 2
    Member
    1084 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: April 2014

    I’m pretty sure most people are aware that a company decided to market its product (how awful…). I don’t understand why marketing gets put into two categories: 1) if it is somewhat successful and just markets the product then it is just marketing, and 2) if it is wildly successful and the product booms and the marketing does what it intended to do then it is a scheme.

    Also, I’m pretty sure diamonds have always been considered a traditional stone for engagement rings. That being said, I would argue that any ring with any stone in it is considered a traditional engagement ring. There doesn’t have to be just one type of traditional ring. And yes I’ve heard all the stuff about other gemstones being used as engagement rings and I’m not arguing that, just arguing that diamonds were also traditionally used. 

     

    Post # 3
    Member
    7664 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

    I got a diamond because, like you, I wanted a neutral stone which wouldn’t clash with my outfit. I was also unusual, I suppose, in that all of the engagement rings from my mother’s side which had been passed down through the generations were diamonds… in particular, my great grandmother’s diamond e-ring is the most beautiful thing I have ever seen. It’s a very delicate, platinum setting, with the loveliest, most perfectly cut diamond… maybe about 0.3 carats or similar? In contrast, my father’s side just had plain bands. So I suppose that, subconsciously, I wanted something similar to the rings which my ancestors had worn… and I wanted a stone, so a diamond it was.

    Post # 5
    Member
    1084 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: April 2014

    barbie86:  I was under the impression that diamonds were incredibly rare and expensive until they found a huge mine of them in the late 1800’s. So, most rings did not include diamonds because they were unaffordable, not necessarily because they weren’t desirable.

    I also think it is just hard to say what is traditional when you are trying to look back so far in history. If you do that, why not just say a simple band is traditional or a piece of twine.

    Post # 6
    Member
    398 posts
    Helper bee

    All of this excitement with diamond rings that have to be measured in monthly salaries was completely new to me when I first arrived in the US. So, yes, I consider myself relatively unaffected by the campaign. When my then boyfriend first started hinting about researching diamond rings, I responded that I considered them unnecessary and way overpriced. I ended up with a family heirloom diamond which I would have never picked (or paid for) myself. I wear it not so much because it is my taste, but for the symbolical meaning of it (and also because my husband freaks out if I leave it at home – it might get stolen).

    What I do not understand is the sense of entitlement that if you get married you somehow deserve a diamond and not just any diamond, but of certain size, quality, price and if your man did not cater to your wishes you are entitled to complain and ask for an upgrade. What surprises me even more is that this seems to be the case even if the woman herself cannot afford and would never buy such a ring herself.

    For me, the engagement ring has a purely symbolic value – obviously your fiance wants you to like it and wear it – so presumably he has done his best to pick something nice. Apart from that, if you want a specific ring, diamond or otherwise, no one is stopping you from buying yourself one and wearing it as much as you like.

    Post # 8
    Member
    7262 posts
    Busy Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2013

    I got a diamond because I wanted a clear stone that would match with everything. Also, I was born in the mid 80s, so diamonds are linked to engagement rings in my mind. I understand that other stones are used for engagement rings, but diamonds are what I’m used to and they are my preference. I also love how they sparkle 🙂

    Post # 9
    Member
    232 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: Aug 30th, 2014

    I specifically started out not wanting a diamond – we were looking at moissonite, but eventually decided we didn’t want to bother making a custom ring, which was the only option we found. In the end my ring has diamonds… my fiance got a nice discount code for Ice.com and most of their rings are diamond (and I think he didn’t want to risk picking a colored gem without my opinion, but he also wanted it to be a surprise).

    I’m happy with my ring (it’s a pave with no large stone), though now that I’m trying to be a more ethical consumer, I wish I knew the conditions/location in which my pebbles were mined.

    Post # 10
    Member
    1599 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2013

    I got a diamond because they’re durable, beautiful, sparkly and we could afford it.  I’ve never had an heirloom in my family and I wanted to start one with my husband and I, so I wanted something durable and timeless, as well as high-quality. I am proud of my ring and make no apologies for it, but to each his and her own obviously. 

    I imagine I’m as susceptible to marketing as the next person, however as someone who grew up basically in the woods without  tv or magazines until I was 13 (no net back then really either) I don’t think its as much embedded in me as some younger generations. My mom had always said that she wished she had nice jewelry to pass down to my sister and I, so when we were looking for a ring that sentiment was one of my driving forces. I’m happy with my husbands decision and look forward to passing down my ring someday. 

    Post # 11
    Member
    8047 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2015

    I think you’d have to be back in the 1940s to know if you were swayed by purely marketing – at this point it’s just apart of our cultural wedding lore. I grew up seeing ladies with diamonds rings, so I thought yeah, one day I’ll get engaged and he’ll give me one of those.

    I wear lots of loud clothing and jewelry so I wanted a classic ring that would go with it all and that’s what I got- the design has been popular for over a century and is the most copied ring of all time ever. It’s even the engagement ring emoji. And the brand uses  ethically sourced materIals which is huge. 

    A part from the above reasons I wanted a diamond because they’re gorgeous and sparkly, clear, and expensive/valuable. For the engagement ring it meant something to me that my guy had to think and save, and make a big decision. Because it is the biggest decision (who you marry) and if my guy proposed with a 20$ ring I’d think- did you even think this through? Are you serious? I know that’s not a popular opinion but just being honest! I would NOT have tee hee been happy if he asked with a piece of string because that would signify a rash decision to me.

    Post # 12
    Member
    444 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: August 2014

    The diamond tradition seems no different to me than many other wedding “traditions” that are quite new—wearing a white dress, first dances, even the idea of having a meal at the reception. Some traditions–bridesmads, veils, bouquet tosses–are rooted in history, but their modern conceptions are just that–modern. I think people inherently like the idea of traditions–it makes us feel like we are apart of something bigger–but most people aren’t critical enough to question/explore.

    Post # 15
    Member
    8047 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2015

    barbie86:  yes totally agreed. If he couldn’t afford a ring Id be happy with whatever. But he can, so when he asked me to marry him all the time I would hold up that left hand and say “of course I want to marry you, do let me know when you’re serious” 🙂

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