Quitting smoking success stories?

posted 3 years ago in Wellness
Post # 2
Member
9137 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

nessdawwg:  Since you’ve been smoking since you were 13 quitting is going to be really tough.  You smoked during the time your brain was maturing so your brain has to re-learn how to function without the outlet of smoking.  It’s a deeply ingrained addiction that you will have to work hard to give up and you might need some additional support.  As a result I would recommend seeing your doctor to discuss options s/he recommends to assist you with quitting.  A co-worker of mine ended up using Chantix to quit.

Post # 5
Member
7664 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

The first thing to figure out is this: is it that cigarettes are actually the problem, or are you using them as a crutch in order to ignore other issues in your life?

I had this exact problem when I was trying to quit drugs. In the end, I concluded that the fact I found drugs a bit more-ish wasn’t the problem; the problem was that I was using drugs to keep myself emotionally numb, and not deal with the other stuff in my life.

I concluded that what I actually needed to do was to find better outlets for stress, and to deal with some of my coping mechanisms in a practical way. Once I had addressed these underlying issues, giving up was easy.

For some people, the surface addiction is the actual problem: the booze, drugs, and/or cigarettes are the actual issue. But for others, the problem is not what you put into your body, but the lack of awareness. Once you have that awareness, you have broken the cycle forever….

Post # 6
Member
802 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2015 - Backyard Forest

nessdawwg:  Both of my parents have tried and failed at quitting smoking so many times. They recently just tried using this remedy called Vicebreakers. I know of four people it has worked successfully for. My mom calls herself the professional quitter and said this is the only thing that has ever worked well for her. It’s been 3 months now and my mom thinks she’s finally kicked it!!

Good luck!! 

 

Post # 8
Member
2162 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I started smoking at 14 and smoked heavily at 15 and up. I would smoke a pack a day until I was about 21, then I started smoking almost two packs a day (maybe 36 cigarettes a day). It was awful and I NEVER thought about quitting. I didn’t want to at all. I mean, I thought it would be NICE to not smoke, but I had it in my mind that I would not quit.

After meeting FI I realized that I wanted more out of my life. I was spending over $10 per day on cigarettes. I had watched my dad die of cancer (not smoking-related). FI surprised me with a marriage proposal in April after my 23rd birthday and I surprised him by saying that I wanted to quit smoking. We were visiting his family so I just said after our flight home, that’s it, I’m gonna quit.

I had to use Nicorette lozenges because my cravings for nicotine were out of this world. They burned my mouth a little bit but it’s what I needed. I suffered from fear and anxiety and depression the first couple of weeks. Anytime I was faced with stress I would freak out and scream about wanting a cigarette. I was awful, haha. BUT, it was over before I knew it. At some point without my knowledge I lost the need to hold a cigarette to my lips and inhale. After a few months of the lozenges I switched to peppermint Altoids Smalls, and I noticed that I craved the nicotine but it was only a matter of days until the cravings subsided.

I’ve now been smoke-free for over two years and even I can’t believe it! Where did the time go??

I believe in you, so good luck in your journey to quit smoking!!!! It is an achievable goal!

Post # 10
Member
636 posts
Busy bee

I know someone who was a lifelong smoker who quit with champix. I also know someone who smoked for 30 years or so and she quit by switching to a vaporizer (e-cigarette). I would recommend the e-cigarette, just make sure you get the good ones. Not sure where you live but laws for them vary by country. Here in Canada we have to order them online from the U.S. and sometimes they get confiscated because they’re not approved here yet (they’re totally safe though, our country is just backwards about smoking). It’s incredibly hard to quit cold turkey and this helps with that A LOT.

The friend who quit with the vaporizer was amazed right away at how much it felt like smoking, so it satisfied that habit (not like gum or lollipops), but all you inhale is nicotine without any of the other bad stuff. She also liked that she could just take one drag and she didn’t have to smoke a whole cigarette like she used to, she that helped her cut down from the first day she used it. She then weaned herself off completely because you can control how much of the actual drug (nicotine) you get and slowly reduce your dosage. I have no idea where you would buy these things outside of Canada, but they are getting more popular and there are “vape” communities around because they have helped people with smoking so much. Nicotine probably isn’t great for you, for sure, but all the other stuff in cigarettes (tar, formaldehyde, the other 200 chemicals) is way way worse for you, and with vaporizers there is no combustion (fire) so all you get is nicotine, nothing else. People use it as a “harm reduction” approach, so even if it takes you a full year to quit completely (or never, as some poeple never quit), you are cutting out 99% of the bad stuff of smoking, which will improve your health regardless. I’ve seen them work really well for people who are very ingrained in the habit of smoking, and who like that feeling of pulling on a cigarette. Champix could work too but it’s also a heavy drug, my other friend who quit with that said he didn’t feel like himself on it. Anyway, keep trying different things, something will stick eventually!

Post # 11
Member
2162 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

nessdawwg:  Ouch! I had the same thing happen to me with the patch! 🙁

Post # 12
Member
1067 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

nessdawwg:  I quit smoking using e-cigarettes 🙂 I was able to reduce the nicotine level gradually while still satisfying my habitual oral fixation. I just naturally stopped wanting it.

Post # 14
Member
7664 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

nessdawwg:  If you are no longer using cigarettes to help you emotionally, all you have to do is to quit the physical habit, which in my experience was much easier (I also used to smoke as well).

I second the others… start with a vaporiser, which will give you that nicotine hit without the other nasties. Then just gradually reduce to break the physical cycle. If you find that you need to smoke for emotional reasons (I really need a cigarette!) rather than physical ones (getting a bit jumpy) then you know you have more issues to address than just the physical addiction.

By the way, how is it going with your “stepson”? I remember you from the other thread!

Post # 15
Member
889 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

I can’t even remember how old I was when I started smoking but I was definitely still at school…it started as an occasional cigarette with friends, then it was only when I was on a night out, before i knew it, i was on 20 plus a day 🙁

None of my family smoke and i never really liked being a ‘smoker’ (smelly hair and clothes, yellow tinged fingertips, constantly having to chew gum etc not to mention the cost) so i tried repeatedly to quit with little or no success…hypnosis, patches, willpower etc…

When I first got together with FI, he made it clear he really hated being with a smoker and that it could even end up being a dealbreaker for us which I think was the kick up the butt I really needed as there was no way I wanted to risk losing him over a few cancer-sticks! I set myself a date and told everyone i knew what i was doing, I worked in a local pub at the time and got all the regulars on board and one got me a chart with stickers to check each day off as it passed. Everyone was super supportive and I gave myself little treats as each month passed. i also started a savings account and put the £100 a month i would have spent on cigarettes in there as an extra motivator.

That was in 2006…8 and a half years ago…and i have never looked back! It wasn’t always easy and I have been tempted a couple of times but, honestly, i haven’t had a single cigarette since then and there is no way I will ever go back to being a smoker!

Oh, and I still save my £100 a month…it’s my vacation account 😀

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