Really? Celiacs…this just keeps getting worse…

posted 3 years ago in Wellness
Post # 3
Member
10493 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

Have you had a biopsy?  You can’t be fully diagnosed until that is done, and you need to be eating gluten for it to be accurate.  I don’t have Celiac Disease (I’ve never actually been tested), but I do have relatives that do.

Don’t throw out cutting boards if your FI isn’t going to go gluten free, but yes, you will need your own gluten-free things.

Post # 4
Member
2675 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2014 - Madison, WI

A friend of mine has both Celiacs and Crohn’s and I know she has to be very careful about contamination or she’ll be home sick all day. It seems like any pourous kitchen items like wooden spoons, cutting boards could end up holding in contaminants and keep contamination your food. Plastic/Metal seems like if it’s washed it’s okay.

You have to really learn to read ingrediants lists and learn every word in those that can be code for gluten. Also, some of it is trial and error. For example she can eat steel cut oats but not your everyday quick oatmeal. Things like alcohol and coffee also seem to cause a bad reaction with her. Finding good health food stores that sell a wide variety of gluten free options can also be very helpful but these places tend to be very pricey. May or may not be a concern. My friend was a broke college student when she was diagnosed – no pizza and beer for her. She ate a lot of gluten free tortillas with peanutbutter on them or frozen gluten free burritos.

Before going out to eat, check menus. Many places now have gluten free menus available. If you’re not sure, call ahead to ask.

Research subsitutions for things you love, try learning to cook & bake gluten free yourself but don’t be too discouraged if certains things don’t work out or taste as good. Again, it seems like a lot of trial and error. 

I also found my friend had to explain herself a lot, she didn’t mind it but people would often question her diet and eating habits. Or why she would refuse something. Some people did it to be more understanding though and try to make sure if for example they brought a treat into work like brownies that they would bring in something for her. She even attened weddings where the bride got her a small gluten free cupcake or something to eat for dessert.

I can’t be of much more help since I don’t deal with it personally, but from what I’ve learned it seems like research is key. There are a lot of online resources and of course talking to your doctor can also be helpful.

Post # 6
Member
668 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2014

Man, I can’t imagine having to be dairy and gluten free! I do not have Celiac but am gluten intolerant. There are lots of alternatives for those days when you want something bread-like (Van’s, Udi’s). Get ready to eat rice and potatoes and quinoa if you like starch! 

Avoid sauces, gravies, or salad dressings that you don’t have the ingredients/nutrition facts for or that you did not make. Gravy and white sauces more often than not have flour added as a thickening agent and some commercial salad dressings have gluten as an ingredient (for texture/thickening and “mouth feel”). When in doubt, don’t eat it. Be prepared to have to bring your own food a lot of places. Even with the utmost caution, you’ll probably still get “glutened” on occasion. For the cuttin boards and utensils, I generally prefer plastic because it is not porous like wood (especially because it is generally recommended that wood utensils don’t go into the dishwasher).

Good luck! Hey, at least you’re not allergic to eggs!!! Or peanuts! Or regular nuts!! (Please feel better)

 

Post # 8
Member
10493 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

@Laurenskii:  I think most people here go through with it because it allows you to claim GF foods for taxes.

Be careful with the GF menus in restaurants.  The problem is it’s become a fad, and some people who don’t have Celiac disease do fine with them.  I know that people have become sick because of cross contaimination.

Post # 9
Member
1938 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

First of all hugs. I know the diagnosis of celiac disease can be very daunting. The good news is though, that since gluten free has become a fad diet for many (i mean those who don’t truly need it). It has become much easier for true celiacs. There are a great number of gluten free products on the market now and prices are coming down. Labelling is becoming more clear on many national companies. And there is a ton of information on the internet.

To get you started, I would look to see if you can get an appointment with a Registered Dietitian. There may even be classes on celiac disease by a dietitian in your area. That is the best way to get the right facts on celiac disease and how to find the right foods for you.

Post # 12
Member
10493 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

@Laurenskii:  Double check, I was referring to the CRA.

Post # 14
Member
2562 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

Once you get the hang of no gluten, it’s really not so bad.
You can replace just about everything you eat with an alternative, and some of them are yummier than the gluten version!

But you should really get the biopsy just to be sure… just because your doctor is 99% sure doesn’t mean he’s right!

A second look will help to confirm things.

P.S. – a tip! We keep a bag of gluten-free cookie mix in the house, make it in small batches (because the whole bag makes 3 dozen cookies, who the heck needs that?!) and add in whatever mix-ins we like. Last week we made pumpkin cookies, they were delicious! I’m planning on making a homemade bulk version of the mix when I get the chance.

P.P.S. Try different types of rice if you don’t like it… some of them are worlds apart in taste and texture (personal favorite: jasmine rice)

Post # 15
Member
10493 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

@Laurenskii:  I shouldn’t have used the word ‘you’ it made it more confusing!  Hopefully you can claim the food in the US as well.  It wouldn’t surprise me, the deductions there are way more complicated, but with more opportunities.

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