(Closed) Receiving your pro photos — Any help/opinions appreciated! :)

posted 7 years ago in Photos/Videos
Post # 3
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

I think you should edit some favorites….but they should all be somewhat edited. We got maybe 20 or so edited and then the 80 that went into our album. At the very least, lightroom batch them. I photoshop batch all my photos so the color is snapped up and the exposures are spot on–but i don’t go in and touch up skin and all that other stuff. I just feel like it makes everything look better.

If you don’t want to spend forever doing them, outsource them for a few hundred bucks. The whole lot of them will look better and in the end, boost your business. 

Post # 4
Member
5399 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

My photographer gave us a DVD with all the photos unedited.  When we asked for the photos they edited for our album we were denied…jerks! 🙁 And you don’t even want to know how much money we spent on them.

So, if you could at least do that, or give them a set number of photos to choose that you’d agree to edit that would be awesome and I’m sure they’d really appreciate it. 

Post # 6
Member
5399 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@gocubbies: I know, it’s super annoying.  GRR!  From what I know I do have rights to them.  They drive me nuts because they are all watermarked, too.  I’ve had offers to edit a couple photos around here, so I got a few done, but other than that I don’t really know where to go about finding someone to edit more, so I haven’t done anything with the rest.

Post # 8
Member
5399 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I know, all the stuff wasn’t clearly in the contract either, which is what drives me nuts about the whole thing since we tried to refer to the contract with them when discussing it, but we had no luck, they wouldn’t budge. 

We ordered a bunch of family photos to gift to our familes as gifts, and for one of them we even paid EXTRA to do extra photoshopping on it (changing someone’s smile, moving someone so you could actually see their face, opening one other person’s eyes) and they wouldn’t even give us a copy of that photo even though we paid extra for the extra work!  Those photos cost us an arm and a leg on top of what we already paid for our photography package.  And the worst part, when we got some of the the photos they were SOOO dark!  Luckily they replaced them, but still, grrrr!  

Anyway, I’m totally threadjacking your thread, but hopefully my experience will be helpful for all your future clients! 🙂

Post # 9
Member
10367 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

@gocubbies: I think that showing the bride unedited photos is a baddddddd way to start your business. At minimum, correct them for white balance and exposure. Then see if she wants to do any edits if you so choose. Since you are new to this, I would also pick a key photo that could use editing and show them what the difference would be, so that they know what they are getting/paying for. Most people don’t know what can be done with digital processing! Just don’t let a customer see the raw images. It would disappoint most people to see what photos look like right out of the camera.

Post # 10
Member
10367 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

Oh, and I forgot to say – I got every photo edited. There weren’t any that I wanted specifically retouched. Ii’m sure she smoother my skin, and her processing is classic and fabulous, but nothing like moving people/fixing smiles/deleting people needed to be done.

Post # 11
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

Read below (I originally posted in another thread).  Charge what you need to in order to spend the time required to create a quality product to show the customer or you will forever be a craigslist photographer. Base your packages on what your competition offers in the market tier you want to be in.


@kate169:  Your comments are very true.  There is a decent lower end market, and with low cost, comes the expectation of the custmer that the photographer has little experience.  The philosophy is that some pictures are better than no pictures, and typically the client is willing to take that risk for the money they are commiting.

When working in this market, your goal should be to get past it as quickly as possible.  If you find yourself still advertising on craigslist after the first or second year, there is something you are not doing right, and it’s probably more business and marketing than skill and talent.  Yes, you will probably find steady work, and you may have the mentality that some money is better than no money, and since you have a full time job already, this is ok.  A lot of pro’s despise these newcomers because they claim they undercut them and “steal” business away, especially customers that don’t have an eye for quality and that are shopping on price.  There are many debates that these photographers are killing the industry.

I am with the school of thought that these photographers are huring themself (not the industry).  Typically, when starting out, your process is not streamlined and you don’t have pro equipment, and I am not just talking about the cameras (fast computers, backups, proper editing software with plugins, a dedicated space at home for client meetings instead of always going to them,etc,etc,etc)  All of this = time, and I don’t care how you look at it, time = money.

The biggest mistake newbies have is pricing themself the lowest in the area.  Besides devaluing your own work, you get a rep for being “cheap,” and unless you start fresh under a new name, it will be almost impossible to raise your prices significantly.

Although the mentality is that “some money is better than no money” what happens is that you fail to meet your overhead expenses.  Remember, using your equipment depreciates it, cameras have a limited shutter life!  Then there are also business costs, insurance (required for wedding photography), web site hosting, gas and wear and tear on car driving to gigs, etc.

Sadly, most of the “Joe Blows” that I have seen surface, are out of business (give up) after a year or so and it’s mostly (IMO) how they bring themselves to market.  When you charge very little, the only way to increase revenue is by taking on large volumes of work.  When you really see what your overhead expenses are and how many hours you work on a gig, you will get tired of slaving to the wee hours of the morning night after night for minimum wage (or less) on an hourly basis.  At first it may be fun, but eventually you become the slave to it, and for what?  5 bucks an hour?

If you are really  interested in breaking into the wedding industry, this is not for the forum for it.  You will get more insight participating in a professional photography forum where the members are mostly professionals.  You can feel free to PM me with questions, but, I don’t feel this is the place for these types of ongoing discussions.

Post # 12
Member
3620 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

My photographer put a sample up on her website of ~40 of her favorites, all edited. She then gave us two dvds of photos, all edited, and two dvds of unedited candids that she thought would supplement our albums. LOVE them. We also got a proof book of all the edited photos. She took over 9,000 photos, and we received about 1,000 photos. I am still curious to know what was in the remaining 8,000 that were cut!

Post # 13
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

@7SEVENJ9:  9000 photo’s = shotgun photography.  Even for a 10 hour gig, thats 15 photos per minute or 900 an hour.  They were probably mostly duplicated shots, missed exposures if she didn’t give them to you.  Who knows what they looked like, it’s more a confidence thing, she felt she needed that many to choose from to deliver XXXX acceptable shots  A 10% keeper rate is really low IMO, I don’t know how these people do it and make money.  I’d shoot myself sorting through 9000 images.

Post # 14
Member
3620 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

@user876 – we had two shooters, so she didn’t take all of those. We were so happy with our photographers, they were great to work with and their final product was incredible! AND she has worked with us before, and gave us many more photos than she usually takes/gives given that she liked working with us.

Post # 15
Member
1405 posts
Bumble bee

@7SEVENJ9:  I am not saying your photographer isn’t skilled or delivers quality work.  Even for 2 photographers that is A LOT of images, especially if you only planned on giving the customer a 10th of them, but everyone has their own technique so whatever works for them.  There is nothing wrong with taking that many, I was just providing some insight on why someone would do that since it’s not typical.

The beauty of digital is that you can immediately see an image and make corrections and then retake it, or take a ton of images (shotgun) and pick the best of the bunch for a certain event or pose.  This is great for weddings to make sure you capture everything,but you would never see anyone take that many images in the film days (they couldn’t afford it). 

I think digital has spoiled a lot of new photographers that never shot on film.  They really took care in what they were doing before you heard  “click!” to make each image count.

 

Post # 16
Member
7695 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

We got over 2,000 photos on 3 discs. Some of the photos were edited with different lighting and some were not. I dont know if this was every single photo though because I noticed a skip in file numbers (like DSC001 then next photo was DSC004) but there were a lot of duplicates and even ones where they werent the greatest picture. Im glad I got (almost) all of them though because it allowed me to pick and choose my favorites. I would give her all of the photos on discs – at least do a lighting/exposure balance on them so they look a little better than just raw and then from there ask her if she has specific photos she would like edited.

Post # 17
Member
713 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

We’ve only received our engagement photos but our photographer gave us a DVD with about 90 shots. All of them were edited. I’ll be happy to receive the photos from our wedding in the same manner – on a DVD, all edited. I can imagine some brides may appreciate picking through unedited ones… but for the most part I see that as the photographer’s job.

Post # 18
Member
739 posts
Busy bee

On average between my husband and I we shoot around 3500 for an 8 hour day. We then edit that down to around 80-100 per hour of shooting. Get rid of the repeats, the flash misfires and awkward expressions. We then take those into LR and make sure the white balance and contrast are prefect, this doesn’t take to long because we are from the school of make sure its right in the camera and not ‘oh i will just fix it later’. THEN we pick 100 or so of our favorites from the day and fully retouch those in PS. These 100 are also going to be what we would pull to put in our portfolio, blog and submit to publication so it’s all done soon after the wedding and we can move forward with the next. We deliver both the 800 or so edits and the 100 or so retouched on two DVDs, divided into two folders. One for printing and one for posting on the web. The web ones have our logo watermark across the bottom. We also include a personal reproduction rights PDF on the disk that outlines what they can and cannot do with the images. The disks are all personalized disk and packaged nicely in a way that represents our brand.

We also provide our clients with an online proof gallery that makes it easy for them to order stuff and pick out their favs for their album. We do offer the retouched images from their album as an upgrade.

On a side note, I did see some of your images from your first wedding before they were taken down and I think you did a pretty good job for not having any experience. How did you find handling the flash work out for you?

 

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