Results of genetic tesing after miscarriage?

posted 2 years ago in TTC
Post # 2
Member
9525 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

I’m so sorry about the miscarriage. but I know you’ve been struggling.

I actually work in the kind of lab that does that kind of genetic testing. The most common abnormal result is some sort of aneuploidy (an extra or missing chromosome, usually an extra one). The next most common result is probably triploidy (an extra set of all the chromosomes). The more rare results areissing or extra pieces of chromosomes. There is also the possibility of a translocation (piece of chromosome stuck in the wrong place). The only one that could affect future pregnancies would be the translocations.

Likelihood of finding an abnormality depends on your gestational age at the time of the miscarriage and I don’t  remember them all, off the top of my head. 

 

Post # 3
Member
2802 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

Mine was triploidy – 69XXY. My doctor made it sound like that was relatively common, as far as chromosomal abnormalities go, and that it was really just bad luck. I’m hoping you’re healing as well as can be expected and that you get some good answers from the genetic testing. <3

Post # 4
Member
422 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

GrannyPantiesRock:  I am so sorry for your loss GPR, it’s not fair. FWIW my results iin Jan were positive for Turner’s Syndrome. Essentially the baby has only an X where there should be XX or XY. 99% ‘self abort’ (lovely term), 1% are born, but have life long complications including lack of a female reproductive system. I wouldn’t wish it on a child. I did get closure from finding out though. 

Post # 5
Member
1896 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

I don’t have any experience on this since my miscarriages were early and passed on their own, but I did have a question for

JenGirl:  Do you know if some people’s likelihood for chromosonal issues is increased based on egg quality?  Everyone says it’s just bad luck but since so many of us struggling with MCs have multiple issues, it seems as though maybe we have something that increases the chances of chromosonal issues…..   Just curious if you had that level of insight into this… 

Post # 6
Member
179 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

 

GrannyPantiesRock:  They couldn’t get live cells to grow for mine so we couldn’t find out.  but it was twins so it could have been down to how they divided or something.   I was disappointed because I wanted to know, but thats life sometimes. 

Post # 7
Member
715 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

GrannyPantiesRock:  I’m so sorry for your loss, lady. I hope your genetic testing results can provide some closure for you.  I had the products of my second MMC tested and my results were genetically normal male.  I wasn’t expecting that so just brace yourself. My doctor said it was most likely due to a cellular problem, not genetic.  I so badly wanted a definite answer.

Post # 8
Member
2741 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

GrannyPantiesRock: My results were genetically normal female, I was expecting to find out the baby had some type of abnormality and it wasn’t meant to be, so it was painful to find out the results. I hope you’re healing and the results give you some closure.

Post # 9
Member
5788 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

I had a MC, but it was early and passed on it’s own. Mine was prob due to something genetic since I was almost 42 when it happened. 

But I just wanted to pass along something I wish more women knew, especially if you are having recurrent MCs–make sure you take Folate, not Folic Acid. 50% of women cannot process Folic Acid, so they should be taking Folate. Most pre-natals do not use Folate because it is bulky and expensive. 

Post # 10
Member
9525 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

Andthepupmakes3:  Well, I can tell you what I know: Women are born with all the eggs they’ll ever have. So as a woman gets older, her eggs get older and have a higher likelihood of having the wrong number of chromosomes. Therefore, the risk of aneuploidy gets higher with increasing maternal age. It’s something that increases over your lifetime and there’s no magic line that you cross to when it’s “high” but it’s why you hear so much about risks for problems with the baby or miscarraige as women get older. 

What I don’t know is what “egg quality” means. How do they define that?

Generally aneuploidy is a random event. The human brain has a really hard time with the concept of “random”. We like patterns and will find patterns, even when none exists. So keep that in mind. The awareness of miscarriage and aneuploidy has certainly gone up a lot in the last decade, but I don’t think that the actual rates have changed. People are just paying closer attention and catching more early pregnancies that might not have ever even been identified. 

Post # 11
Member
2741 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

KoiKove:  I’ve had 4 chemical pregnancies and 1 miscarriage, and none of my REs ever said anything about taking folate instead of folic acid, it was my acupuncturist who pointed out that I should be taking folate and I just started taking it.

Post # 12
Member
333 posts
Helper bee

As a woman gets older the easiest way to think of it in common terms is that her chromosomes get “sticky”.

Once the egg becomes fertilized cell division starts to occur. Each time the cell divides the chromosomes are replicated and because the mother’s chromosomes have been hanging out in her ovaries for, say, 40 years, they are more likely to “stick” to each other. This is commonly why triploidy happens, and an extra chromosome can only be survived if it is on a few specific chromosomes, most commonly 21 (Downs Sydrome).

Post # 13
Member
1312 posts
Bumble bee

Blessings to all who have posted. 

I had 3 losses previous to the birth of my son. There was only one “specimen” of MY CHILD collected by the idiot who was supposed to be the best OB in the county, and adter he did an HSG on me with NO anesthetic of any kind, he and I parted company.

I definitely would have preferred to have known, but I did go on to have 2 healthy children. 

I’m sorry to have to say this, but for me, “closure” has never happened.

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