Resume help? :3

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
2052 posts
Buzzing bee

@ZombieBullfrogHoller:  Looks like you have some skills fellow bee!  That’s awesome!  Here’s my Feedback:

1)  You should put an objective at the top of your resume.  Like..”Action oriented employee seeking job for….”  This way the employer has the opportunity to see if you are a fit for the job

2)  I’m confused by the organiziation.  Job status should be listed chronlogically, with your MOST CURRENT role first.   I’ve also been told that education should be either the first thing or the last thing on your list.  If you didn’t have a great GPA like 3.5 +, then maybe it should be last.  I also find all the lines seperating the sections confusing.  I would play around with different templates on microsoft

3)  Have you considered a cover letter?

4)  Student researcher says 2009-2013.  Are you still doing this?  Can you put 2009-Present, instead?  Then have your job, then your other student job as well?  I’d play around with it so everything doesn’t have to look all over the place.


Whats good:  Everything is in the same tense.  Your name is the biggest thing on the page as it should be.

Please remember the average hiring employer may look at the resume for an average of 15 seconds.  If your resume is to difficult to get through because it’s not even in chronological order, they may throw yours away and move on to the next one.

Good Luck!

Post # 4
2052 posts
Buzzing bee

One more thing–The date next to the education is in the middle of the page, while all other dates are all the way to the right.  Your graduation month and year should be all the way to the right as well.  You want this to pleasing to the eye.  That’s my 2 cents, I’ll let other bees chime in!

Post # 5
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@veryberry13:  +1 to all of this especially the objective (though I never call it an objective).

To add, I really dislike the format (sorry, but I do). I am not sure what is going on with all the equal signs, but it is really distracting. I am also not sure about the difference between Past Experience (and please change that title) and Employment – it’s all experience and should be grouped together with most recent first.

The skills don’t really speak to me, i.e. sensitive to cultural differences is not a skill. This part should be strong and a summary of all of the skills you obtained in all of your roles. Then the accomplishments under each job title should be exactly that – specifics for what you actually accomplished and how it benefited the company.

I’m not sure how much detail you want here – I do this for a living, lol – but that’s a good start. Good luck! 

Post # 6
2627 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@ZombieBullfrogHoller:  Show me, dont tell me. 


IE “conducted research…” so what? What does that show me you know how to do as a future employee. What kind of research? Did you design the methodology, how did you execute it? 

“Analyze data” Again so what? How did you analyze it, using what program, statistical theories etc? What conclusions did you draw? Why were they important? Show critical thinking

Who did you present your findings to? collegiate professors? How many did you present to?

Think of each bullet as a cause and effect. I did this and this was the result… 

Use numbers and other quantifiable measures to demonstrate your success/aptitute.

How many people/articles/data pointes etc did you analyze?

What kind of materials did you create? demonstrate your thinking and creative skills be being more specific

And objectives are largely considered unnessary. A skills summary with the highlights of what makes you a perfect employee for that specific job description, however, is a good idea.

Post # 7
454 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

@ThreeMeers:  +1

OP, be as specific as possible. When you say you collected and analyzed data – how many subjects did you collect data on? how many records were in your data set? what statistical techniques did you use, and in what statistical software programs?

Do you use programs like Endnote, and perform literature searches in Pubmed or another journal aggregate site? If so, say it! Really get detailed about all the things you’ve done.

As a fellow job-seeker, I feel your pain. Keep workin’ it, girl!

Post # 8
11626 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I think it just looks like there’s a lot of wasted space – huge indents, lots of extra spacing where it isn’t necessary, etc. 

I do hiring in my job, and to be honest, I don’t read objectives or skills.  Your objective is to get the job, and your skills should be demonstrated in your work experience.  Unless your skills is some unique thing that wouldn’t be evident elsewhere, it’s redundant.  I don’t think the skills you listed are worthwhile on a resume – Office skills are basically a given these days, the sensitivity to other cultures should be a given, and the hotel software is only an advantage if you’re applying to that specific hotel. 

Post # 9
454 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

@MrsPanda99:  +1 to this advice, too, OP!  Especially the bit about combining “past experience” with “employment” – I’d just call it all “experience”.

Post # 11
2627 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@ZombieBullfrogHoller:  Its a delicate balance.

You want to give them enough detail to show your skills and so they are interested to learn more

If I knew more about research I could show you an example.  Doo a google image search of resumes for the job titles you are applying to get an idea.

But as an example (I pulled this from an old job on my resume)

Instead of

“Analyzed data for new clubs”

it would read

“Interpreted variance analysis reports tracking performance of new clubs with expected revenue of $74MM and capital expenditures over $150MM and composed detailed commentary.”

Post # 12
1007 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Agree with others- everything on your resume should be an achievement, not a job description bullet point.  If that’s completely impossible for some things that you have to have on there to demonstrate skills, but don’t have quantifiable achievements for- then phrase the description to show why you were great at it- maybe despite x and x difficulty, or you did it “efficiently”.  Also rephrase your sentences so that the action word is at the beginning- “Researched” instead of “Conducted research…”.  They scan down the bullets, so the words need to jump out.  

You need way, way more description. I mean I guess you’re getting callbacks, which surprises me a little with the limited amount of info on your resume, but I would flesh out the descriptions.  My two jobs fill up about 2/3 of my resume, with a tiny blurb about my education at the bottom and a little skills section at the top.  Dump the equals signs.  Use capital letters and slightly larger font to differentiate the headings.  

The resume format that makes the most sense to me is 


Current position

Past positions



If applicable in your industry, a skills section is also good.  I think objectives are really outdated and silly.  They take up space where you could spend more time explaining what you bring to the position.  They know you’re looking for a job in whatever industry they’re in- it’s not like you’re going to say anything else in your objective.  Your application is your objective, fill up that space with more achievements.  Obviously, every single resume should be tailored to the job you’re applying to.  I prefer to reorder the skills in my job sections to mirror the skills in the job listing, both to make sure I covered everything and because if they’re comparing the two, they will resonate better.

And a fantastic cover letter can be the key to getting your resume read.  It depends on the industry. 

I highly, highly recommend the Ask A Manager blog.  Her tips and advice have been invaluable for me in refining my cover letters and resumes.  The “every bullet point should be an achievement, not a job description” came from her and it has made a major difference for me. 

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