(Closed) School Districts – Best school or is very good school enough?

posted 5 years ago in Home
Post # 3
Member
5755 posts
Bee Keeper

Since you may be pretty far away from even having kids, so many other things in your life can change and you’ll move on or away anyway. Right now, if the house you like is in a stable, safe area and you feel both the house and time are right for you, why would you let anyone else’s opinion sway you? No one can predict the future, and who’s to say that school district’s rating won’t surpass, over time, the one they think you should consider?

There’s lots of things to weigh when considering buying a home, but a stranger’s feelings shouldn’t be one of them.

Post # 4
Member
416 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

@kay01:  I wouldn’t make that your deciding factor.  We were deciding between buying a house in our city versus a suburb, and the city schools here are horrible (I mean really awful, about the worst in the state).  But we were three years away from even maybe TTC when we bought, and then another 4-5 years before our first child would even be school-aged, so 8 years before we need to use whatever school we’re near.  A lot can happen in eight years, and if we still live in the same area, we would probably move by then anyway.

If it’s your forever-home, then I might think about it a little bit more, but if it’s probably not, then I wouldn’t base your whole decision around that.  Taxes will be higher in the other district too.  Good luck!

Post # 5
Member
374 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I’m a teacher, so education is very important to me.  That being said, I think you should trust your gut and stay where you are.  You do not have children yet, and it sounds like you’re not planning to TTC anytime soon, so the school district, especially the high school, isn’t relevant right now.  And remember, even after you do have children you still have 5 years until they’re ready for public education.  That’s plenty of time to reevaluate!

Post # 6
Member
9 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2013

School ratings change over time. What was the “best” school 5-6 years ago is often not #1 today. Also, I have found the ratings to be highly weighed upon standardized test results (in my area, at least). You just have to ask yourself if you feel that’s a good way to rank a school.

If we had gone to the top performing districts we would have had to comprimise greatly on our house. And we don’t have kids yet! I personally say, as long as the schools aren’t in trouble you will be fine. Hell, I went to a good-but-not-great school and I ended up graduating college with honors!

Post # 7
Member
557 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@kay01:  I can’t comment on the property values but I can comment on the schools as I’m a teacher. There are differences between schools but the number one factor in determining the quality of education a child gets is the teacher. And great teachers are everywhere. I’ve taught at very very poorly ranked schools and seen great teachers. I’ve taught at a top ranked school and seen mediocre teachers. I think you’ll be fine. Good luck!

Post # 8
Member
1880 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

I think good enough is good enough. Besides, there are studies who show that children who excel at not top tier schools go on to do better in life than students who are middle of the road at excellent schools, likely due to basically the ego boost of being the best. So as long as the school is decent, I wouldn’t sweat it.

Post # 9
Member
5148 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I would say “good school” is good enough. And that these parents are just part of the ever-judging “I’m better than you” mom culture. 

And really, as long as the school is good, it doesn’t matter much if it’s “good” vs “best”, it’s the involvement of the parents that makes for the success of the kid over the course of their schooling.

Post # 11
Member
6015 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: March 2012

I guess the question is … do you just want to do “good enough” for your children. 

Post # 12
Member
1359 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I want my kids to go to schools that are safe, where they can make friends, that have enough resources to challenge them (good library, arts classes, field trips, etc.) and where they get a decent education in math, science, writing, etc. But do I want them to go to a top performing school? No, because I don’t want them to feel pressure to be top performers. It is not important to me that my child wins competitions or gets perfect scores. I’ll support and encourage them in whatever subjects they seem interested in, but I don’t believe high performance is the best measure of a good and successful life. 

So in your position, I would choose the “good/very good” school over the “best” school every time.

Post # 13
Member
1880 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@HisIrishPrincess:  That seems really judgmental. You can do fantastically by your children without each and every thing you get them or do for them being “the best” on paper.

Post # 14
Member
557 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@kay01:  One more thing…

The school I just started teaching at is ranked the highest in the district, if not the state. It’s all so subjective though. If I had children I would NOT enroll them in this school. I don’t like it at all. You have to take numbers and rankings with a grain of salt. They don’t tell the whole story.

Post # 15
Member
349 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

You get out of your education what you put into it.   Your kids could go to the best school in the world, but if he/she hates school/is a slacker, etc. they’re going to get a mediocre education that they don’t care about.   Likewise, your kids could go to the worst school in the nation but if they love learning & seek opportunities they could end up graduating as a neuroscientist from Harvard. 

 

Go with the good school (hell, go with an average school if you want), but read to your kids. Take them to museums, show them that you love learning & new experiences, and that will matter so much more in the long run than an arbitrary school ranking.

Post # 16
Member
80 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

I personally think the best for your children (and not what is rated the best) is a school that has an AP program, after school activities, a good graduation rate, and a higher SAT/ACT score and I think almost all suburbian schools have those. After that, its honestly up to the kid and the parents to navigate the school system. I went to best school district in my hometown and now I am living in an area that isn’t as wealthy but still safe/nice with a “good but not best” school district and honestly the statistics and atmosphere of the school is the same. Kids who want to learn will, kids who don’t want to will find a way not to in any district. Like other posters have said, its up to the parents to instill a love of learning young!

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