Silk Wedding Dress Train on Concrete. Do I need an Aisle Runner?

posted 3 years ago in Decor
  • poll: Which aisle option is best?
    Bare conrete- you only wear your dress once so it's ok for some snags to happen : (8 votes)
    42 %
    Aisle runner - figure out a way to get it to stay down on concrete : (7 votes)
    37 %
    Flowers - they're pretty and can offer some protection against snags? : (4 votes)
    21 %
    Other : (0 votes)
  • Post # 3
    15014 posts
    Honey Beekeeper
    • Wedding: June 2011

    I would do an aisle runner, you can double sided tape it down.

    Post # 4
    1627 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2010

    Concrete is smooth. I don’t think your dress will pull and snag.

    Post # 5
    10748 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2014

    I wouldn’t bother with an aisle runnr if you don’t want one. Your dress will get ripped and torn no matter what. I was trying to be careful but my bustle ripped out once, we fixed it with safety pins, and it ripped out again. Then I just held it up for the rest of the night dancing but I didn’t care by that point, I was having so much fun.

    Post # 6
    629 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    What kind of silk? Dupioni or shantung would be fine. A stretch charmeuse blend might not. More for the effect where you wouldn’t be gliding down the aisle, rather getting snagged up and bouncing every couple inches. 

    Post # 7
    1216 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    @MrsHopper:  I would ask the point person at the venue if anyone has ever had a problem with this. You could also go to a fabric store by some silk fabric and drag it along that concrete and check.

    If you decided to do an aisle runner you could keep it down with smooth stones since it’s near the water.

    Post # 8
    155 posts
    Blushing bee

    @MrsHopper:  So i don’t know much about modern day wedding dress construction but costume history is a bit of a hobby of mine so this might sound like a crazy idea. How about a dust ruffle? Also known as a “balayeuse” they were used in trained dresses in the late Victorian era. There’s more info on what they are (even how to make one – maybe a seamstress could help? It might also be as simple as just attaching extra length to a petticoat of some kind) here: Also this is a great example of a couture dust ruffle by Frederick Worth. 



    Post # 10
    155 posts
    Blushing bee

    @MrsHopper:  Hmmmm, so after seeing your dress i think that anything too heavy like a gathered lace might look a little strange (as you feared – but i have to say the dress is gorgeous!) maybe something like a thin silk petticoat will protect the dress but still keep that light airy look you’re after? 

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