(Closed) Spin Off- Good reads for a parent of a child with Autism/Aspergers?

posted 7 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
5984 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1999

@SoontobeMrsA:  You’re too sweet.  You wouldn’t be thread-jacking my hive, friend.  Although I’m sure you’ll get multiple rec’s this way.  Here are some of my favorite resources/sites/books (from an SLP’s perspective):

1. Anything by Michelle Garcia-Winner (an SLP) – http://www.socialthinking.com/what-is-social-thinking/about-michelle-garcia-winner  She has a plethora of resources for those kiddos that have social language needs.  In all honesty, she’s one of the few speakers that I get REALLY PUMPED to see!  She’s always creating and producing great materials to use at school and home.  Some of my fav’s of hers are:  You are a Social Detective, Thinking about You thinking about Me, Sticker Strategies, etc. She has a 10% off sale right now for summer (which would cover shipping). 

2. Temple Grandin (a successful woman with Autism)-http://www.templegrandin.com/ When I first became a therapist, I saw her in person and really thought she was inspirational (and unique, in a good way).  My favorite book she wrote is Thinking in Pictures.  I’d like to read the Unwritten Rules of Social Relationships.

3. Daniel Tammet’s Born on a Blue Day is terrific!  It’s another book similar to Thinking in Pictures, explaining what it’s like to be HFA/Asperger’s, but also inspirational.

4. A fun read is Mark Haddon’s  The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is a good one too.

5. A great website with numerous, FREE resources is SpeakingofSpeech.com .  The materials exchange is my favorite section.  So many wonderful and useful items that you can use with your daughter.   

Here is a site with a TON of resources (quite overwhelming, yet awesome):

http://www.autism-resources.com/books.html

Post # 4
Member
616 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I loved this book: “Son Rise” by Barry Neil Kaufman. It is an older book (and it is out of print) but it is a good read. http://www.autismtreatmentcenter.org/contents/resources/son-rise_tmc/index.php

This family is amazing! I work for an ABA focused program, but this program is interesting (IMO).

 

Trying to remember any of the other good ones I’ve read. If I remember I’ll post em!

Post # 5
Member
616 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

@melisslp: One of my client’s parents let me borrow the Temple Grandin movie. Very interesting! I will have to check out her books.

Post # 6
Member
5984 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1999

@Corykru:  I’ll have to check out your suggestion too.  I find that you can learn alot from authors who have “walked the walk”, so to speak.  Hope you find Temple’s books inspiring and thought-provoking!  Smile

 

I also just checked out the book Look Me in the Eye – My Life with Asperger’s by John Edler Robinson, a 40ish male who lives with social issues, and despite his difficult childhood, he worked for KISS and created his own business.  The last phrase in the description reads, “This is the story of Robinson’s journey from his world into ours…It’s a strange, sly indelible account – sometimes alien, yet always deeply human”. 

Post # 7
Member
2313 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

@melisslp: 

Not sure if you know this, but he is the memoirist Augusten Burroughs’ brother!

Post # 8
Member
1701 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

The Out of Synch Child is a book about sensory processing disorders, and was recommended by a parent of a possibly-autistic (high functioning likely in the spectrum, maybe PDD) child in a kindergarten class of mine.  She said it helped her so much to understand how to work with him.  I’ve meant to read it but haven’t. 

Has there been a definitive diagnosis? If not OOSC may be helpful, as sensory processing is quite related.

Post # 9
Member
2195 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

@melisslp: First of all, I always wondered if the SLP meant what I thought it meant, and not just your initials. Yay! Love me some speechies.

Second, I would have exactly the same recommendations. Michelle Garcia Winner’s books are my bible. I live by her curriculum, and the kids really respond well to it. Using it at home would be amazing.

 

The Curious Incident…is one of my faves also.

 

 

@SoontobeMrsA: is your child receiving services? If so, I would find out what kind of approach the team is using and start your research there. It can be confusing if there are too many learning styles coming at them. Good luck! Feel free to PM me if you need help! Although Melissa seems to have covered literally everything I would have said, including my favorite website.

Post # 10
Member
9825 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I am so psyched about this thread right now and have my Amazon shopping cart all ready to go! I just called in for my 100 Day Kit from Autism Speaks and am researching the process we need to go through to find an Advocate… long process, but so much fascinating information.

Post # 11
Member
5984 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 1999

@ohheavenlyday:  Isn’t he a famous author?  I had no idea!! 

@cvbee:  Very good recommendation too!  I have a lot of friends who really enjoyed the Out of Sync Child as well. 

@pinkandsparkly: Yep, you’re right.  The SLP is for Speech-Language Path.  Smile  Are you an SLP as well?  What setting do you work in?  Gotta love Michelle!!  She is AMAZING and the kiddos really respond to her lingo/vocab. and lessons.  One of my favorite lessons which I modified/created (which goes along with the Social Detective book) was when I took the Cootie game and used the eyes, head and body to help my students to become more away of whether their eyes, brain, and body were “part of the group”.  I would snatch parts off during lessons at first (very concrete for my students to understand), then as time went by the children would begin to identify what “drifted” away from the group during our lessons, and now my kiddos are able to identify this without use of the Cootie parts!   We’re now working towards ways to correct when our parts (eyes, brain, body) are not “part of the group”.  Michelle is truly fantastic and really has helped me to become a better therapist for these special kiddos! 

@KatyElle:  I’m SO glad that you’ve found this thread.  There are NUMEROUS resources out there for parents, families, therapists, and students themselves.  Very happy that you’ll be getting your kit soon.  Autism Speaks is a fabulous organization.  I think an advocate that specializes in Autism would really be helpful for you.  Please let me know what I can do to help you or to guide you throughout this “maze” of information.

Post # 12
Member
9825 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@melisslp: Thank you so much. I will probably be PMing you with many questions in the next few months. I sincerely appreciate your help and reassurance. The Michelle Garcia-Winner books look outstanding.

Post # 13
Member
2195 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

@melisslp: I am! I work in a collaborative school setting with high schoolers. The classes I am working with right now include non-verbal autism (a lot of AAC and board maker/MJ symbols) and high functioning autism/Asperger’s/NVLD, which is 99% pragmatics (HELLO MGW!!). I do a lot of “full body listening” and “keeping your mind in the group” as well as bubble thoughts and mild files.

@KatyElle: Feel free to PM me as well! The Garcia Winner books are definitely fabulous. I have not worked much with younger/early intervention populations, but I do know that early detection and enrollment in treatment is CRUCIAL!!

Post # 15
Member
2195 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

@SoontobeMrsA: I meant 99% of the therapy I do is pragmatics (which is social communication or how you “use” language). There is a fine line between NVLD and Asperger’s. In my experience, the different is typically intelligence. I obviously do not know your daughter, so I can’t make any judgements about her intelligence or skills in general. The biggest piece of advice that I give all of the parents I meet is to just continue to expose her to as many social opportunities as possible. Give her time to practice and observe the social skills she is learning and developing in treatment. I think (and I’m sure I am not alone in this) that carryover of skills at home is JUST as important as in school/therapy.

 

Feel free to PM me if you need any more recommendations or have other questions. I somehow got to be a bit of an Asperger’s expert in the setting where I work.

Post # 16
Member
9825 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I’m currently reading Louder than Words to sort of ease me into the autism reading. I didn’t want to dive right into the technical stuff *just* yet. I love it and find myself nodding and in tears every few pages. Very inspiring.

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