Spinoff: Forever commitment to pets

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
2400 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I would try my very hardest to keep my pitbull if I had to move. It’s hard because most places won’t allow him. I have a couple circumstances where I would rehome a dog;

1. If the dog bites my child or gets overly aggresive with my child. I’m sorry but there is no way I would keep a dog that I can’t trust to be around my DD’s. One bite and the dog is gone to a home that does not have children.

2. If we could not find a house to live in that would accept our dog. If it came down to a roof over our heads and our fur baby then we would have no choice but to find him another home.

 

Post # 4
Member
2725 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I am a big pet person,  and every pet we ever had in my family was a rescue. My personal belief is that when you bring a pet into your home, you are bringing them into your family.  As family members, they should be afforded certain rights, and that includes that you will do everything you can to give them a happy, healthy life.

That being said though,  there are exceptions to every rule. If my pet was making other members of the family unsafe  or if for some reason I couldn’t afford to care for them, then I do think it’s ok to find them a home they would be happier in. Sometimes when you love something, the best thing you can do is let them go.

Post # 5
Member
1218 posts
Bumble bee

A lot of people think that nobody could treat their pet as well as they could. Which of course is not the case, there are many wonderful pet owners out there. We have had pets we have kept for life and we have had pets that we have had to re-home, sometimes life just goes that way. As long as you take the time to find the right home for the pets there should never be a problem.  

Post # 6
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@kay01:  I made a commitment to my furbaby for the length of his life. I don’t have a “dangerous” breed dog and I own my home. I can’t see any reasonable circumstance where I would ever give him up. If he had behavioural issues, that would be my fault and not his. I would get him the training he needed and not just give up because it’s hard. Also, I wouldn’t move somewhere that didn’t allow my dog.  

Post # 7
Member
664 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

I’m usually 100% for keeping pets no matter what, but in this case I wouldn’t say it’s wrong to rehome. If someone has serious allergies and cannot be around that animal, it doesn’t make sense to put a permanent relationship on the rocks rather than finding someone else to love the cat.

Post # 8
Member
1939 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

My parents had to give away a family dog once. He was a rescue dog and we had him about 2 years. My mom was 8 months pregnant with my little brother when one day she tripped and fell. The dog got on top of her, pinned her down, and was growling at her so badly he was salivating. He kept opening his mouth and placing it on her (neck, shoulder, wrist). He didn’t bite her, but he remained on top of her, pinning her down, until my dad came and had to forcefully remove him. He was a Collie, so not an aggressive breed. My parents found him a home with no children and LOTS of land so he could do whatever he pleased. They never felt even a speck of guilt because my mom felt unsafe and was worried about how he would behave with a baby in the house.

Yes, a pet is a forever commitment, but sometimes things come up. Circumstances change, the animals change. To my family, it was more important to keep my mom and a new baby safe. It makes me mad when I see people giving their animals away on FB/complaining that they had to take them to the pound because they “just weren’t prepared for pet ownership/just didn’t have time anymore” but I do think there are acceptable circumstances where it just isn’t possible to keep the pets.

Post # 10
Member
2546 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

I wouldn’t feel guilty over rehoming a pet. In fact, I’ve done it. A dog I used to have hated the apartment we lived in. He was sad all day no matter for how long he want outside. He now lives in a farm with my dad where he is perfecly happy. I haven’t felt guily for one second. I miss him,  but so what?

Post # 11
Member
9412 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@kay01:  Exactly. So I wouldn’t rehome that dog. I personally wouldn’t do it. I’d find a way to make it work.

Post # 12
Member
2353 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

Well if a dog is attacking people I don’t think it’s appropriate to pass that problem along. If it can’t be managed, it is my responsibility to humanely have the dog put down. It would be hard, but you adopt those kind of difficult choices with the dog (or cat, I have dogs so that’s where my opinion comes from).

If you move, you bring your dog. This requires planning ahead, having extra money set aside for security and pet deposits in case of an emergency move, and maybe moving somewhere not your preference e.g. to an apartment with a further commute or fewer amenities or more expensive rent to accommodate your pet.

You think ahead about life choices: you don’t date someone who can’t tolerate your animal. You think about the future – my dog was five weeks and I was 20 when I adopted him. So yeah, it’s probable I will own him when I enter motherhood. Having a baby is not an excuse for giving him up. 

Just because someone else could care for your animal doesn’t mean its ok to rehome them. You are their family, they aren’t humans but they do have emotions and memories. They will miss you when you give them up and be confused and afraid. Maybe those feelings would fade overtime, but maybe not. And if someone is adopting your pet then they’re passing over a potential pet that IS in the shelter that they may have adopted otherwise. 

Post # 13
Member
3989 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I love my dog like no one else, but I always think about what would happen if I had a baby and my baby was allergic to the dog.

I’d have to give her away.  And that would probably be the only circumstance in which I would do so.  My DH can take benadryl 🙂

Post # 14
Member
10748 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2014

My cat is my baby, so I would never consider getting rid of him – no matter where he went. I know he’d be heartbroken that I abandoned him and so I would I. 

When I was growing up, my sister developed allergies to our cats. I told her I’d kill her if she ever got so allergic that my parents wanted to get rid of the cats. Luckily she agreed with me and that was not an option for our family! My sister just lived with itchy eyes. 

Post # 15
Member
1218 posts
Bumble bee

Considering the amount of pets we have brought into our home (both while I was growing up and now in my own home) because their previous owner was unable to keep them, I can tell you first hand that pets easily adjust to new homes within a few weeks of being re-homed and love their new owners just as much as their previous owners. In fact many pets end up even happier becuase their new situation is better suited to what they need, be it space, or time or companionship. I find it very selfish to think that there is nobody else in the world that can take care of an animal as well as you can.    

Post # 16
Member
293 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2014

Whether or not I’d rehome depends greatly on a huge number of factors.

First, if the pet is becoming dangerous to people for no reason that I can fix (aka, personality change and suddenly starts attacking kids, or hit by a car and the same happens, and initial training is not promising) I would find a home where the pet could live out its life safely and loved. Humans come before pets.

Second, if something irreversible about my living situation was making my pet miserable (like cat cannot stand having carpet around and I can’t find anywhere without carpet for a reasonable amount of money, or dog suddenly becomes unhappy with the amount of space we have for it, even though we have a backyard) then I would totally rehome it to somewhere better-suited.

But if I got a dog when I’m in an apartment (like I am now), it’s pretty much my fault for bringing a dog into a bad situation (imo) and I need to fix it to make the dog happy and healthy. Rehoming is an acceptable solution, but I think a bit of judgment in that sort of circumstance is justified – the result was forseeable and preexisting, and I chose to ignore those circumstances.

I’ll also note that I’d have contracts or something similar with the new home, so that I get right of first refusal should they chose to rehome the pet again. That’s just something I wouldn’t be comfortable leaving out, personally.

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