Spot guarding dog

posted 3 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
4797 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

MissusMarcin:  Omg, I loooove him! I looooove beagles! I have 2 myself! And 2 other dogs and lemme tell ya, one of those other dogs is the same only worse. So I’d love to hear the answers. I just thought of one, though. Does he know the “off” command? As in get off the furniture or wherever he shouldn’t be “on”? I wonder if we teach them that if it would work??

We DID hire a behaviorist (sort of) for this other dog, he’s super afraid of people and wants to bite them and bark. BUT he has that snarling, snapping issue if you try to move him. I WON’T for the most part because he’s pretty brutal. Grrr.

LOVE beagles! Did I mention that?? Lol!

Post # 4
Member
2368 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

Something that I’ve noticed is that after the initial phase of puppy training, people stop praising the good behavior. Dogs still want to please you after the puppy phase. Retain the ‘come here’ command using positive reinforcement. Not just when he’s somewhere you don’t want him to be -anywhere. So if he’s just chilling out, call his name, and when he comes to you, reward him. You always want to associate a command with a positive response. 

Right now, you’re actually associating the command with a negative. Off the couch = getting dragged from a comfy spot. The goal is to associate off the couch with praise and/or a treat.

Post # 5
Member
855 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: March 2008

Your problem is that you allow him on furniture and then don’t want him on furniture and dogs don’t have the cognitive ability to decipher when it’s OK to do and when it’s not OK to do. Stop letting your dogs on the furniture. If they wish to be near you, then let them lay on the floor near your feet.

You may not be able to afford a behaviorist, but can you afford a good trainer?

Post # 8
Member
2368 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

MissusMarcin:  they ARE smart, which is both a good and bad thing. If he’s responsive to praise, that’s always a good thing! I agree with PPs who said that all the dogs need to always be off the furniture (I assumed he was never allowed up there). Otherwise, it causes confusion. 

There are deterrent methods that you can use as well when you don’t have eyes on him. You know those carpet protector mats, the plastic ones with nubs on the bottom? Cut one to fit the couch, and put it nub side up. They’re not comfortable to sit on. At the same time, make sure you have a nice, comfy spot where he should be. Encourage the use of the comfy spot, and discourage use of the couch.

Post # 9
Member
4797 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

MissusMarcin:  Oooh, I LOVE them!! Gimme! Lol! If and when I get some answers from a behaviorist, I’ll let ya know. For free! Yes, our 3rd dog is real trouble. It’s pretty difficult actually. Grrr.

Here are mine! The one on the left on the ottoman is the Killer.

Post # 11
Member
695 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

I’m writing about the – snarles and snaps.  Now I’m not there with the dog to see it.  And this advise is free so you know…

It sounds as though the dog may be pulling a dominant thing with you.  

You may have to enforce with him that the couch belongs to YOU.  That couch does not belong to HIM.  First when the dog is freaking out on you wait until he is calm.  I would not put a time limit on it, it may take 5 minutes, it may take 25 minutes.  Depends on the mood of the dog.  Look up on the internet how to snap the dog out of his momentary state of mind.  A choke chain may work, Snapping a rolled up newspaper on your hand to make a loud sound, Clapping, whatever. You should refrain from talking to the dog.  They are animals and don’t understand human talk anyway.  You are trying to get him to do a basic command.  No use in talking it out with him.  Get the dogs state of mind calm.  Please no treats when he is not feeling you.  Stand in the dogs personal space when claiming your space.  Don’t step backwards, the dog will read this as weakness on your part.  Don’t be frustrated, raise your voice or scream “NO”.  Don’t grab the dog and move him.  When the dog is calm training should begin.  Be calm, be assertive and claim your space.  When the dog is calm you can kinda gently push the dog off the sofa.  Stand your ground.  Keep your head above the dogs head level at all times so show your dominant.  Only give dog love or a treat when he does what he is supposed to do.

With getting him into the crate.  You have to learn to snap his mind out of the current aggressive state of mind his is in.  Come up with little exercises daily with practice of him getting in and out of crate.  Make is a positive experience.  When dog is in calm submissive state of mind throw a little piece of steak in there or something.  Make it positive and somewhere he can hang out.  Be calm and assertive, but not frustrated.

Post # 12
Member
6273 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: October 2013

 

DJones69:  the dog might be smarter than you give him credit for.  DH had his beagle for 3 years before moving in with me.  prior to moving in, the dog had free range of DH’s apartment, was allowed on furniture, etc.

i was the mean mommy and do not allow furniture or free range of the house. 

i’ve softened a bit and now the dog is only allowed on our laps on 2 particular chairs.  the dog will even sit in front of chair waiting for us to sit down so he can jump on our laps. he knows he isn’t allowed on any other furniture.

  MissusMarcin:  keep trying with the treats.  don’t scold bad behavior, but reenforce the good behavior.  if he growls, ignore it.  maybe if he was laying on a blanket, you could lift it up so he has to jump off and won’t get your hand if he snaps.

the dogs behavior may also change when kids are around.  i’ve noticed that with dogs before.

 

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