Study: more expensive e-ring/wedding correlated with higher divorce rate

posted 2 years ago in Relationships
Post # 2
Member
5207 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

SithLady:  That article was kind of a no brainer but I understand where the author was going with it. Money is not what makes a happy marriage.

Post # 3
Member
2455 posts
Buzzing bee

Eh I don’t think it has much to do with anything but I think the correlation may be pointing to the couples who spend so much they start out their marriage with debt. Which is really stressful to a marriage.

So not an expensive ring/wedding per se, just one that’s too expensive for them.

Also there’s always over compensation to account for 😉

So, no I don’t think there is a link but it’s fun to try and figure out where people are seeing the correlation.

Post # 4
Member
481 posts
Helper bee

playdohpants:  That’s what popped into my head – overcompensation! Maybe some people buy pricey rings/have giant weddings to help convince themselves that marrying this person is the right thing to do. 

Post # 6
Member
954 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

My thoughts on a possible correlation is this: the more expensive the ering and the wedding, the more you’re increasing th chances that Someone is marrying for money not love. One reason for divorce. However, if you don’t have alot of money (and therefore did not spend a lot on the ering or wedding), someone could not be marrying for money, and so you’re removing one reason for divorce so the overall divorce rate is lower. That’s just the first thing to come to my mind! 

Post # 7
Member
481 posts
Helper bee

SithLady:  Yep, I’d be worried that they’re concerned about the wedding more than the actual marriage. 

Post # 8
Member
1055 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2014 - Loft

SithLady:  what about the people pleasing aspect? I think anyone who’s main motivation is to “appear so happy” usually meets an unhappy ending sooner than later.

Post # 9
Member
643 posts
Busy bee

SithLady:  I can see through the connection through couples potentially caring more about the symbols, status, and celebration versus the actual marriage. Hopefully people spend more time focused on the marriage than planning the party or choosing a rock. 

Post # 10
Member
10493 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: January 2011

I don’t think extrapolating data from the US to the entire world is all that accurate.

Post # 12
Member
1108 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

What if you’re sporting a rock that was a family heirloom? 

Post # 14
Member
811 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2015

I understand that to some people spending 10,000 on a ring is not a huge deal, but for others it is. However, I will always stand by my view that beyond a certain point/size spending that kind of money on a ring is not necessary at all. $100,000 for a ring, for example is never makes sense, even if you are a billionaire. It just doesn’t.

it’s the same logic as: I COULD spend $10 for a gallon of milk at the grocery store without going broke, but I NEVER would unless I had no other options because that’s just stupid.

So naturally… Rarely do I think the purpose of excessively large rings is the ellusive “finger coverage” excuse and so on. I think that it potentially demonstrates (potentially) certain characteristics like materialisticness, disregard for money’s value, and other things that don’t necessarily lend themselves to a successful marriage.

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