Teacher bees: What is your "best practice"?

posted 3 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
3084 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2014

@OnceUponATime:  hmmm I never really thought about my best practice. 

I teach high school math and all of my lessons are on the smart board. I always back them up lol. I wish I could do the binder thing, but I never kept up with iT. 

Post # 4
Hostess
1468 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

@OnceUponATime:  Well I was only a primary school teacher for a short period of time and didn’t have my own classroom so unfortunately I can’t really answer this for sure but I will try

Primary school anywhere from prep to grade 6 (might be different in Australia?)

Not sure if its considered a best practice but I really like to differentiate within the classrooms. I would try to tailor my lessons to account for the different learning styles, levels of understanding and cultural differences within the classroom to help all students access the learning.

Post # 5
Member
851 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013 - The front lawn of our church

@OnceUponATime:  I teach 3rd and 4th grade combination class. I teach all of the subjects. 

My best practice is probably that I send home a “packet” every Monday that communicates the tests and quizzes for the week, any upcoming projects or events, the weekly spelling list, any study sheets, and all of their graded work from the previous week. It’s all posted online through our grading system, but many of the parents don’t check and then are upset when they “didn’t know” about a test. Sending the homework all together helps me, because I don’t have to stay up on it if there’s a day I need to get home right away or whatever. It also helps the parents because they know to expect it every Monday. If they don’t receive it they know that they need to ask their kid for it.

Also included in the packet is a note that states “I received the packet for this week, 12-2-13.” The parents have to sign it and the students bring it back to school on Tuesday. 

This has solved nearly all of my communication problems!

Post # 6
Member
4540 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2014 - Royalton White Sands

Ooh I love this thread! I’m a student teacher, so I haven’t really found mine yet, but I bet this thread will be full of great ideas. 

Post # 8
Member
851 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2013 - The front lawn of our church

@mrsztobee:  I promise you, it has made teaching a million times easier!!! And the parents love it!

Post # 9
Member
895 posts
Busy bee

@hisgirl10:  just genius! especially if a student is absent they don’t get behind… I’m still a student but I’m going to write this down some where haha

 

Post # 10
Member
1987 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@hisgirl10:  ooh I love that!  It might be harder to do for HS, but I like it a lot!

 

I teach high school biology.  I very very rarely lecture.  I’m constantly having the kids doing stuff instead of notes.

One of my favorite activities that can be changed to suit any grade are my 4 x 4 puzzles.  I take a piece of computer paper, divide it up into 6 boxes, and draw with marker over the lines to divide the paper up.  I then write vocabulary words on one side of the line and definitions or examples on the other side of the line.  Vocab words are in all caps and the definitions are lowercase.  I then cut the paper up along the lines and place them in an envelope.  

Kids get the puzzle and have to put it back together.  Short sides have to match up with short sides and long sides with long sides, so that you end up getting an 8.5″x11″ piece of paper at the end.  Words can be upside down from each other.  If I want to make it harder, I put random stuff around the edges of the paper that the kids will have to define when they finish putting it all together (otherwise they can easily do the border first).

Post # 11
Member
536 posts
Busy bee

When I taught, I had a set of 30 small (12″ by 16″) whiteboards.  Before quizzes, I’d run drills with the kids where I asked a question and they wrote down the answer on their own whiteboard. After a set period of time, they all did a “reveal” of their answers (“3,2,1… Show me your boards!”). It was great because the kids enjoyed it and were more engaged, and I was able to do a quick scan of the room and see if everyone got the concept, or if I needed to review it again.

I actually really miss teaching 🙁

Post # 12
Member
1987 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@spezia:  ooh!  I do that too 🙂

 

Also, I just found this pretty cool website called socrative.com where teachers can create an account and create quizzes or exit tickets that the students can take on their smart phones.  It gives instant feedback to both the teacher and the students.

Post # 14
Member
536 posts
Busy bee

@OnceUponATime:  So I left and worked in corporate America (had a TON of student loans I needed to pay off), got my MBA and now I work at the district level 🙂

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