Terrible twos !!!

posted 3 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
167 posts
Blushing bee

I have three kids. 12, 8 and 2. My 2yr old is driving me nuts.. The whining never stops. Whine whine, whine, temper tantrum, then whine some more. He even fake cries like he’s trying to win an Oscar. He is like a little tyrant running around trying to run our house. I try to be patient and not answer his whines until he talks in a normal voice. If he’s acting up in public I remove him from the area (even we are out to dinner, we just pay and leave). I give him two minute time outs when necessary and I don’t give in to temper tantrums. It’s hard and I want to scream sometimes but this will pass. I know it sounds crazy but later on when he’s older I’ll wish I had it back 🙁

Post # 4
Member
167 posts
Blushing bee

@babypearls:  oh you said “how do you cope?” Um, I don’t. Hahaha.. No really, I take breaks when offered. His dad will get him out of my hair for awhile or I let him go to his grandmas when they want to see him. Even just relaxing and surfing the net while he’s napping helps me.

Post # 6
Member
8 posts
Newbee

I have a two year old, and 3 older step kids. I’ve noticed my two year old behaves better on the  weeks we have the other kids. I don’t know if she follows their example, or is just more tired from having other kids to play with.  Maybe schedule play dates for your child with other kids to tire Her out? Also I’ve noticed that if my daughter doesn’t get a nap she throws more tantrums. The terrible twos don’t last forever, and you are not alone!!

Post # 7
Member
1743 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

1–sure she’s eating a well-balanced diet.  I know this sounds ridiculous for a toddler but eliminating as much sugar and processed foods as possible will help.  Kids love to dip so substitute fruit and veggies for fries.

2–enforce a strict sleeping schedule.  No exceptions to nap time and bed time

3–limit TV and electronics before bed and try to limit period.  This is right up there with getting toddlers to eat vegetables but the effect of TV on developing brains is really horrible

4–my nephew has Down’s syndrome and is non-verbal.  However, he can easily point things out to you if he is looking in the fridge, cupboard, etc. Try doing a little more of that or other “communication games” but make her use her words.

5–lots of physical activity–is there a playground near by? You might not be able to do it, but can someone take a class with her? Swimming, movement, Story hour at the library? The quote is, “a tired dog is a good dog” but I think that works for children too:) if she doesn’t get out a lot, more frequent changes of scenery can help.

I’m sure you’ve read volumes about this stage and how to cope.  This will pass.  One day she will be 16 and you’ll just wish she had difficulty verbalizing:)

Post # 8
Member
167 posts
Blushing bee

@babypearls:  You’re welcome!

       My son went through this phase when he first turned two where he would hit me in the face when he was frustrated or angry about something. I would just tell him to stop but wasn’t sure what else to do because my other two boys had never done that. Plus, I felt bad punishing him because I didn’t think he understood me or what I was doing. The pediatrician I work with told me that even though he couldn’t talk well he could understand consequences. She said to put him in his high chair for a few minutes (as a time out that he couldn’t escape from) every time he hit me. I did that, and it actually worked! After that I didn’t feel so bad anymore. Lol. 

I was too afraid to stair step, hence the big gap in my kids ages, patience is not my strong suit. Sometimes I wish I had though because it really does have a lot of benefits…. I’m sure when your newest little one comes, you’ll be great, just remember when it gets hard to breathe  and most importantly cut yourself some slack! 

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