TIPI WEDDING!

posted 2 years ago in Reception
Post # 2
Member
1088 posts
Bumble bee

No advice as yet but I’m planning something similar for next year and was about to start a similar thread. I might just lurk around on here. 🙂

I’m looking at trying to get 60-70 into a single tipi or single tipi wiht an extension.<br />If anyone has experience of how reliable company number estimates are, that’d be fab as they vary hugely for tents with the same measurements.<br />As with SophieFrancisW, tips, advice would be welcome. 🙂

Post # 3
Member
107 posts
Blushing bee

SophieFrancisW:  I may be out of line, but are you by any chance Native American? It may come across as cultural appropriation/insensitive if you or your fiance aren’t citizens of a tribe.

Post # 4
Member
50 posts
Worker bee

I had a tipi wedding a couple of weeks ago. We had a 12m and a 10m joined together, with casual seating and a fire in the smaller tipi and 6 rectangular tables, 24 chiavari chairs, a band area and a dancefloor in the other. Between the two we had a serve-yourself drinks table and a few ice tubs with beers in.

That was just perfect for a party of about 70 people chatting and dancing, but not for a sit down meal. If we’d wanted a sit down meal and a dance floor I think we would have needed another 12M, or removed some tables after the meal. Also we had rooms in the main hall for people who wanted to sit and talk away from loud music so probably didn’t have 70 people in at once.

If you are going to decorate them yourself, you’ll need a tall ladder – they are very high in the middle. Other than that, usual tent/marquee advice applies ie think about toilets, kitchen and electricity.

Post # 6
Member
1236 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - San Francisco, CA

missanonybee53:  That was my first thought at well.

Post # 7
Member
50 posts
Worker bee

rachel85:  

Really? I thought it was a rather ignorant and disrespectful comment. 

Disrespectful to lump all Native American people together when only some tribes/nations used tipis

Disrespectful to ignore the non-American cultures who also used tipi-type structures

Disrespectful because it implies that a tradiitonal design like a tipi can’t just be the best tool for the job.

Now, if someone had suggested a Native American-themed wedding, I could see the concern. But just a certain shape of tent? No.

Post # 8
Member
7219 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

missanonybee53: you may come across as insensitive when delivering a lecture.

 

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 2 months ago by  BalletParker.
Post # 9
Member
28 posts
Newbee

Tinatiny1:  

missanonybee53:  Missanonybee53 seems to have nothing kind to say.  I have decided to stop posting or asking about ANY of my ideas because I realized I don’t care what strangers have to say? They could be basic.

Post # 10
Member
7219 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

CourtChuk: aw, don’t let a few self righteous people who don’t even have the sense to use Google before getting smug stop you from asking for help or feedback. seriously:-) 

Post # 11
Member
1236 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - San Francisco, CA

bettybubble:  Ok, well, that’s fine. You’re entitled to feel that way and express your frustration. But I think missanonybee53 made a pretty delicate statement about how it might be interpreted, and everyone panicked. To me, it’s a bit like someone said “I’m having a chuppah at my wedding!”, someone asking if they’re Jewish, and a couple of respondants piling on about how ignorant and unhelpful it is to assume that only Jewish people use canopies.

I have a friend from college who is Arapaho, and when I was planning my wedding, she treated me to a long, impassioned rant about how most of the style blogs featuring American Indian (her chosen identifier) elements like tipis were mostly non-Native women who like the “dreamcatcher” aesthetic. It makes her incredibly uncomfortable, and has sensitized me to the issue. Maybe OP is an enrolled member, or maybe she just doesn’t care. Neither of those are really my business, but I don’t think missannony was “unkind” or vastly out of line by making a short, polite statement about it.

Post # 12
Member
50 posts
Worker bee

rachel85:  But the thing is a tipi is not a Native American / American Indian element. It’s a style of tent for which the common name was taken from a Native American word, just like bungalow is a style of house for which the common name came from an Indian word. I’ve seen plenty of tipi weddings when I was researching mine but I never saw one that was in any way aiming for or appropriating an “American Indian” aesthetic.

That’s what I object to – that people are making the reductive assumption that a tipi wedding == Native American theme, then using that assumption as a reason to object to what is basically just a pointy tent. That’s why I think missannony was out of line.

And I think it’s pretty rude to say if someone who is not from a Native American background chooses to use a tipi – a pointy tent with no Native American connection other than the name and the fact that Native Americans were one of many cultures who developed that shape – then that person just “doesn’t care”.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 2 months ago by  bettybubble.
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