Tips for a Cross Country Move?

posted 3 years ago in Home
Post # 3
42135 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I dont know the market or costs where you live, but I do have a top for you. Pack a Last On, First Off the truck box. As it says, this is the last box packed and the first box unloaded.

In it put a small toolbox so you can start assembling things, towels, soap, toilet paper, sheets, coffee maker, drinking cups, eating utensils, pens and notepad.




Post # 4
3476 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

@julies1949:  +1 Also add in a few cooking tools (fry pan, pot, colander, knife, cutting board), cleaning supplies for old/new home (make sure it’s liquids that you can transport).

I know you just decluttered, but do it again.  Seriously, moving is expensive by the pound, so cut out anything you really don’t need or love.

You can get estimates from companies on moving or truck rentals.  Budget a LOT for gas. 

Would you fly out early to house hunt?  I’d suggest that.  My parents did that before our moves (dad was Coast Guard).  You’ll get tired of living at home much faster than you think you will, particularly if your stuff is filling up your parent’s home (my sister did this “temporarily” for 2 years!).


Post # 5
1823 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

I moved cross country a few months ago. My advice is to think carefully about what you decide to take with you, some things will not be worth the cost of transporting them. Throw out every thing that you haven’t actually used recently (last 6 to 12 months). I had a lot of things that I was holding on to just in case I needed them in the future. It was hard but I threw out all that stuff and haven’t even missed it. None of my furniture was very nice, so I left all of it and bought new (well actually used) in my new city for just a little more than it would have cost to move my old stuff.  If possible, I also recommend finding a place before you move, so you can just move straight in, rather than having to move twice in a short time. You can probably find a tech savvy real estate agent who can help you find the right place while you are long distance.


Post # 6
1416 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

well to start, if you can afford to buy new furniture, sell or donate all your stuff and start over because moving fees are really expensive. For me it was easy because i didnt have furniture. Instead of a moving truck i shipped boxes for 4 weeks straight, a total of 300 in shipping cost. Then when it was time to move filled my car as much as  i could and took that 19 hour trip. I know leaving all your stuff isnt an option for a lot of people but it was nice and hassle free. 

Post # 7
10384 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

I think you should rent for 6 months before trying to buy. Buying in a brand new city before you’ve gotten the lay of the land and established in jobs, understand traffic patterns, figure out where you’ll want to be hanging out in down time, where your future friends live etc is a huge mistake. Investing in renting for a short time is a smart financial decision in the long run.

We did a cross country move a little over a year ago (Boston to San Fran) and renting for those 6 months really saved us from picking the wrong place to live!

Post # 8
2367 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I’ve done multiple cross country moves.  If you have anything less than Ethan Allen or designer furniture, sell it.  It’s not worth it and it’s easily replaceable.  Good pots and pans and kitchenware is worth keeping.  The $10 scratched up pan isn’t worth keeping, but the $300 mixer is.  If you can possibly rent first in the new location, I’d highly suggest that.  One person’s idea of a nice neighborhood is another person’s hell on earth.  Otherwise, if you can tolerate living with your parents for a month or two, that’s an option as well. 

Also remember that those moving trucks are gas guzzlers.  The last time I used a moving truck, we joked that it got gallons to the mile, not MPG.  So every single item that doesn’t fit in your car is actively costing you money.  Once you realize that, the paring down and decluttering process tends to become a lot more aggressive.

Leave a comment

Sent weekly. You may unsubscribe at any time.

Find Amazing Vendors