(Closed) tongue tie?

posted 7 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
2192 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

I didn’t nurse but I was born tongue tied and my oldest daughter was as well. I had mine corrected when I was 12yrs old. I have not corrected my oldest daughters because it hasn’t hindered her speech or anything else. I’m not sure that’s totally helpful info for you other than, it most likely doesn’t have serious effects on the child. Good Luck!

Post # 4
Member
10851 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

This hasn’t happened to me, but your story could be written by a close friend of mine I swear! Her son was born tongue tied and they clipped it probably about two weeks after he was born. It wasn’t a big deal. She was worried he would be uncomfortable or in a lot of distress but apparently he was fine. I think that day he was a bit fussy, but after that things improved greatly. He’s definitely eating a lot better!

She’s also using a nipple shield nursing (she developed a sort of yeast infection on one side and it was really painful for her to nurse) and I think it’s helped her although she doesn’t enjoy using it at all. Her son is definitely gaining weight and is a big boy so I don’t think it’s hindering his getting enough to eat! He was born about 2 months ago at just under 8 lbs and is now about 11 lbs 🙂 The plan (I believe) is to wean him off of it ASAP, she’s just waiting for her infection to finally go away which can take upwards of a month.

Sorry I don’t have better answers, but I thought I’d share since my friend has been going through something similar!

Post # 5
Member
832 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2010

so, i have nothing helpful to add because my LO isnt here yet. Just wanted to share, I was pretty sure where the frenulum

Post # 6
Member
311 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2008

I had my frenulum clipped as a baby.  When my son was born, we were having trouble with nursing and I was using a nipple shield.  Finally, a pediatrician noticed that he was very tongue tied.  My supply was low and he was having trouble gaining weight (almost readmitted at 4 days old because of weight loss).  We had a frenotomy and he now has more tongue movement and I can typically nurse without the nipple shield.  At 3 weeks, my supply has unfortunately stayed low even with fenugreek, pumping, etc… and we are still supplementing with formula.  I am actually thinking of stopping nursing because it has been so stressful for me, and for my son.  Feel free to PM me if you have more questions. 

Post # 7
Member
1046 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

The #1 reason why babies don’t gain weight on nipple shields:

LLL does not inform the mother of the necessity to supplement after the baby nurses on a breast with a shield.

The holes in the shield are smaller and fewer. The baby gets less milk. So if baby nurses for 40 minutes, they’re basically getting the amount of milk they would have gotten at 20 minutes. So you’re supposed to give the baby a bottle of expressed milk, or nurse twice as long as you normally would.

This lack of adequate breastmilk can cause failure to thrive, and even death. My son almost died because La Leche League doesn’t inform mothers on this.

Post # 8
Member
314 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

@mrstilly: We haven’t been using nipple shields, but my son was diagnosed with posterior tongue-tie today. We are going to an ENT tomorrow afternoon to get an assessment and have his frenulum clipped. I don’t have any advice, but I will let you know what difference I see in his latch/nursing once he has the procedure.

Post # 10
Member
1126 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

The times that tongue-ties are fixed are during infancy (if there’s trouble feeding), during toddlerhood/beginning of school (if there’s trouble with speech), or later on if the child has trouble swallowing and eating normally.  I saw a girl who was so badly tongue-tied that she literally could not bring her tongue out of her mouth, meaning she couldn’t lick an ice cream cone, and she had trouble making some speech sounds (like Ls and Ts).  The procedure really isn’t a big deal at all, takes just a minute, fast recovery, etc.  So I’d talk to an ENT and see what they think.  I really can’t see it being something you’d regret, and it may be something you wished you’d done sooner.  Can’t hurt to get more information at least!

Post # 11
Member
682 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2009

If you are considering doing the procedure, I would recommend doing it now rather than later. I was tongue-tied, it didn’t really affect my speech except L’s were sometimes difficult. But when I was 20 I needed to have my tonsils out and my ENT convinced me to get a frenulectomy too. It was the worst healing process ever. I had to get stitches under my tongue because she cut it too far and my tongue was swollen for days. She did tell me that had it been done when I was a baby, I wouldn’t have had any problems since kids heal so quickly.

Post # 12
Member
7305 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2010

I used nipple shields when nursing my first daughter and had no problems at all.

Post # 13
Member
314 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

@mrstilly: We went yesterday to anENT and had our sons tongue looked at. The ENT said he was definitely tongue tied and that we should clip it. She explained the procedure and why we should do it. She said that tongue tie can affect his ability not just to nurse, but to eat solid food when the time comes. Plus she said it can make speech difficult and it is better to do it now than wait. We went ahead and had it clipped. He screamed and it about broke my heart, but he nursed quickly afterwards. I’ve definitely noticed a difference in how his nursing feels.. it hurts less and he seems more efficient. I would definitely recommend getting your son looked at and going ahead with the procedure if that is what they recommend. Good luck!

The topic ‘tongue tie?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors