Transitioning Cat out of Soon-to-be-Nursery

posted 3 years ago in Pets
  • poll: What to do with the cat?
    Give him to parents/get rid of him! : (5 votes)
    28 %
    Keep him/work it out! : (13 votes)
    72 %
    Other : (0 votes)
  • Post # 3
    Member
    7664 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

    You may find that, if you allow him to be an indoor/outdoor cat, a lot of these problems will vanish. He will feel as if he can escape the dog, and will happily amuse himself. One of our cats could never be an indoor only cat… he was indoor only for about 8 months (long story) and we never managed a full night’s sleep the whole time, he was so disruptive. As soon as he was allowed outside then BOOM. Bye bye behavioural problems. He’s great now.

    Don’t worry about the winter. If the cat is too cold, it will simply come inside and fall asleep in a warm chair somewhere. If you don’t want him in the nursary, just offer him more space to roam around in and close the doors to the rooms you don’t want him in.

    Post # 4
    Member
    8821 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper

    I voted for giving him to your parents.  The kitty is not going to understand why suddenly his “parents” are gone. Animals don’t really understand. I know it won’t be the same in his usual home but he will adjust in their place.

    If you do keep him, I would definitely block off the rooms.  Eventually the kitty will learn.

    Post # 6
    Member
    7664 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

    @aliciapdx:  I would probably let him be a “true” indoor/outdoor cat immediately… ie put in two cat doors straight away so that he can have more space to roam, and free access to the house, garage, and outdoors. The peeing problem may also be because he doesn’t like going to the loo indoors. He may prefer going for a wee outdoors immediately as soon as he gets access. Also, if he can move between the house and garage then he will be able to escape the dog, because the dog can’t follow him into the garage.

    If he still hates the dog so much that he would rather live in the garage than the house during the winter, you can set up a cosy area with a heater in one of the corners of the garage.

    Then you just close the doors to any rooms you don’t want him to enter and bingo! Job done.

    I’m aware that there is a different culture regarding cats in the US and UK. Here then indoor/outdoor is very much the norm. Obviously, if you have not had outdoor cats before, you need to speak to your vet about microchipping the cat, setting up safe zones in the garden, extra vaccinations with yearly boosters, and parasite treatments. Outdoor cats require you to take more precautionary measures in this regard.

    Post # 8
    Member
    7664 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

    @aliciapdx:  Great minds! Like I said, I know that lots of US bees don’t like the idea of outdoor cats and think that it means you don’t love the cat. Soooo untrue! I’m sat here now with my little boy…. the one who howls constantly if you lock him indoors. He’s curled up near me and purring happily as I cuddle him.

    I love my cats waaaay too much…

    Post # 10
    Member
    1242 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: May 2017

    @aliciapdx:  I think he should go with your inlaws. As previously stated, a 14 year old cat is not going to understand why his “parents” abandoned him. That might be more of an issue then the dog, or a new baby or moving. Haven’t moved many times, cats seem to adjust better to new surroundings then new parents. Will there be an adjustment period, yes. But it’s possible.

     

    Post # 11
    Member
    7664 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

    @aliciapdx:  I currently have three. One of them is quite stupid, and would have made a great indoor only cat, although I couldn’t keep her in and keep the others out. To be honest, she’s indoors over 90% of the time anyway, and she doesn’t wander far.

    The other girl cat could have been indoor only, had we wished it, but we chose to let her out because we were out of the house so much, and we wanted her to have stimulation.

    The boy cat is a hunter, roamer, and adventurer. If you don’t let him out, he howls. He had to be kept indoors for months, and you’d have thought he would have stop howling and crying after a few weeks, but no. He did it All. The. Time. Every day. Continuously. I’ve never known a cat so stubborn. He is also the most loving, however… he breaks into local houses and asks the owners for cuddles. He’s a bit infamous… all the neighbours know and love him.

    Post # 12
    Member
    3360 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: December 2011

    Honestly, I would just set up his food and a litter box and bed area in the garage and let him be a mostly outdoor cat.  Some cats are simply happier living this way, especially if this is what he’s used to.  Our cats are strictly indoor cats, but my brother and his wife did this with their cat, and he’s so much happier!  He roams around their property, spends most of his day sleeping on a bench on the porch, is super affectionate when we come to visit or come outside – he was grumpy and aggressive as an indoor cat (and also peed on everything).  It might seem mean, but I think this may actually be the kindest thing for this specific cat (give him a nice indoor space in the garage with a cat door so he can be outside all he wants).

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