Transitioning from the treadmill to the great outdoors?

posted 3 years ago in Fitness
Post # 2
Member
59 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

The big difference is the lack of wind resistance and a natural variation in incline on a treadmill. Common thought is to always add at least 1 on the incline to mimic outdoor resistance and then to adjust the incline throughout. You could try a adjusting that for a few weeks before going outside, but I think I would just keep training on the streets, maybe going back a few weeks in your program and you’ll be there in no time. 

 

Post # 3
Member
59 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

WithLovein2012:  and a few hills never hurt. I always like to avoid hill workouts but they really help b

Post # 4
Member
344 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

You may be running faster than you typically do on the treadmill…I find that is my problem when I run outside.  You might time yourself to make sure your pace is the same.

Post # 5
Member
5283 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

 

lawyerchick13:  I also found it much harder to run outdoors when I transitioned from the treadmill. I still feel I run way faster on the treadmill. The reason for this might be your pace which a previous poster stated. On the treadmill you can kep a continuos pace but when your are outside it could be changing to alot faster and slower then the treadmill and that can make a whoe lot of difference.

Post # 6
Member
4809 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

Hah, that’s funny- I’ve run 7 marathons and I feel like running on the treadmill is SO much harder!! I feel SO much slower and can’t keep anywhere near the same pace for as long. Turning it to a 1% incline, or even doing “hills” on the treadmill for a few weeks, could help. Or you could just run outside for a few weeks and you’ll get used to it 

Post # 7
Member
1131 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

– start out by running shorter distances outdoors. As a PP said, running outside burns more energy – wind resistance, hills, etc. – so a shorter run burns as much energy as a longer treadmill run. In the future, if you’re training for a 5k outdoors, don’t train for a 5k indoors. If you have to do indoor training, train for a 10k.

– let your body choose your pace. You will speed up naturally when going downhill and slow down when going uphill. It’s not at all like a treadmill where the pace is maintained for you so don’t feel pressured to always keep running at the same pace.

– don’t expect to zone out as much when running outside. You have to pay attention to your surroundings or risk getting injured. I recommend running without music until you get into a good groove, because music kind of takes you out of your environment and I’ve noticed it makes it harder to find a suitable pace, and run safe.

Post # 8
Member
4827 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2013 - Upstate NY

lawyerchick13:  Runner here! I agree; running outside is VERY different. I would say just keep running- keep at it! Doing HIIT will help your speed as well!

Post # 9
Member
3828 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

i would suggest interval training and hill on the treadmill to help with transition. I too prefer outside and usually do all my running outside from may-november. but yes, the treadmill is doing a bit of the work for you and you have no climate changes to deal with. 

Honestly just take it slow! Run 5K, if you need to walk fine, i bet after 2 weeks your body with adjust. 

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