TTC – Four Months In

posted 3 years ago in TTC
Post # 3
Member
3756 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

Progesterone levels change throughout your cycle so since you weren’t sure exactly where you were in your cycle when it was checked, the test wasn’t reliable. I would recommend charting for a few months to see when you’re ovulating so you can better check progesterone levels. 

Post # 5
Member
3756 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: April 2014

Of course! There is a book called Taking Charge of Your Fertility, it explains everything you ever need to know about trying to get (or not get) pregnant. Charting is when you take your temperature each day as soon as you wake up (should be at the same time each day) and record it on your chart. There is a website – Fertility Friend.com – that explains all of this in great detail and gives you the tools to do the charting, and you can do this on your computer or phone, very convenient. Your temperature generally is lower before you ovulate, then after you ovulate it rises for the roughly two weeks before your period arrives, at which point it drops again. Using the charting method helps you to see how your temperature shifts and will show you when you are ovulating. It usually take a few cycles to start to see your patterns. It’s especially helpful for people with irregular cycles.

When checking progesterone levels, they should be checked at certain times during your cycle based on when you ovulate. If you have no idea when you’re ovulating, doing progesterone testing is kind of useless. If you’re charting and can see your ovulation patterns, your progesterone tests will be more accurate.

Four cycles in the grand scheme of things is a very short time to be trying. Each cycle, even if you think you’ve had sex just at the right time (the 3-5 day window around ovulation) you still only have about a 25% chance of getting pregnant. It’s harder than people think!! But using charting as a tool can be very helpful in at least getting your timing right. And if there is a problem, perhaps you aren’t ovulating at all, charting will help you figure that out.

There are a ton of very helpful ladies on the TTC boards, so definitely feel free to post questions/concerns or read through the many other threads that are already here.

Post # 6
Member
3378 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

I definitely agree with @jny1179:  about charting.  A level of 0.5 sounds like a pre-ovulation level to me, so either you O late in your cycles or you have annovulatory cycles.  I’d definitely start keeping track so that you can measure the length of your ‘typical’ cycle and start to see if there is an ovulatory pattern or not.  I love fertility friend (www.fertilityfriend.com) for keeping track of my temps each morning and seeing if I O’d.

Also, like jny mentions, progesterone testing should only be done after O and for the most accurate result, it should be done at 7 days past ovulation.  That will not only tell you if you O’d or not, but also if your progesterone levels are deficient, low, or high enough to sustain a pregnancy.

Post # 7
Hostess
8725 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2012

@heathuhhhhwebbbb:  Charting your cycles would be taking note of information. Your BBT (basal body or waking temperature) each morning can tell you a lot about where you are in your cycle. It can even tell you if you are pregnant or when to expect your period. You can also make note of your cervical fluids, and that can tell you A LOT about where in your cycle you are. For example, egg-white looking cervical fluid means that you are fertile, which would be the best times to get pregnant. When it is dry or sticky, you are not fertile (beginning of your cycle, end of your cycle).  We use fertilityfriend.com to chart our cycles and there is a “Charters of the Hive” thread for support!!

Read this: http://boards.weddingbee.com/topic/what-to-expect-ttc

Charters thread: http://boards.weddingbee.com/topic/charters-of-the-hive-xliii#axzz2pLdf1Blq

My Fertilty Chart: http://www.fertilityfriend.com/home/freckledfox

The lines are my temperature and the green is cervical fluid. The red X is when the charting software says I ovulated. Your best chance of getting pregnant is 0-4 days before ovulation and the day of ovulation.

ETA: I think Progesterone should be checked 7 Days after ovulation, so if they checked beforehand, that could be the cause for the low number. I also thought I had really irregular cycles, but it turns out after charting, I realized that they were just unique to me! Nost women don’t fit the “28 day” rule.

Post # 8
Member
3378 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

Also, I’d agree that 4 months isn’t all that long.  Infertility is defined as having tried for a year or more without a successful pregnancy (or 6 months or more if over 35).  First thing I would do before you start thinking you are broken, get checked out.  Have them check for things like PCOS, vitamin D deficiency, thyroid (MUST be more than just TSH, they need to check free t3, free t4, tpo antibodies, and antithyroglobulin antibodies as well) since all of those can easily throw off your cycles and delay or prevent ovulation from occuring.  

I’ve been through having to fix my truly broken body.  I started out my ttc journey with 17 months of NO cycles at all, then went on to a bit over a long year of 6 losses and lots of testing.   I’ve had 2 surgeries to remove the main cause of my losses (a septum in my uterus – dead tissue), had to change my lifestyle completely, lost 112 pounds, dealt with PCOS, Hashimotos, MTHFR mutations, thin lining, progesterone deficiency (in general but even moreso during pregnancy), and a few other things.  3.5 years later, and I’m pregnant for the 7th time and am finally, for the first time ever, nearly at 10 weeks (I’ve never made it to, let alone PAST 5 before) with what I firmly believe will be my take home baby.

My point is not to scare you.  My mom always used to tell me “Don’t borrow trouble” – in other words, don’t create problems where they likely don’t exist.  Before you start worrying that you are broken, start keeping track to see if your long cycles include ovulation or not, and get checked out to find out WHY you are having long cycles.  Any of these things can be handled even if they can’t be cured.  

Post # 9
Member
1734 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 1998

It is true that on average (keep in mind, this means 50% of women are pregnant by then – while the other 50% are still trying), women get pregnant within 4 – 6 cycles. This is generally longer for women 35 or older.

I’m in my mid-20s and in my 9th cycle trying. So – it can be a long haul. It’s not uncommon for women coming off of birth control (were you on it?) to find that they have delayed or absent ovulation. I was regularly ovulating between CDs 17 – 20 until I started taking B6. Now I tend to fall more in the ballpark of CDs 12 – 15, with a longer luteal phase to boot.

 

Post # 11
Member
2197 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

@heathuhhhhwebbbb:  You might want to look into Vitex as well. It’s an herb that can help regulate hormones, specifically progesterone. Some women it works for, others it doesn’t. And you have to take it for like 3-6 months before seeing effects. Just a thought.  GOOD LUCK and WELCOME to the TTC boards. 

Post # 12
Member
140 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

My cycles were always on the longer side 35-36 days, when i first began TTC #1 back in the Spring of 2012, I decided to begin drinking the Organic Raspberry Leaf tea.  It actually helped regulate my cycle to become a bit shorter 32-33 days.  I was successful by cycle 3.  I was also 35 1/2 years old at the time.  I think it really helped with my cycles.  Now, I’m TTC# 2, I will begin drinking that tea again 🙂

Post # 13
Member
4827 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2013 - Upstate NY

@dodgercpkl:  Thinking of you and your new pregnancy! Congrats!!!

 

Y’all have inspired me to start charting! 🙂

Post # 14
Member
1734 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 1998

OP, when you say “not regular,” do you mean as in – less than 21 days or longer than 35 days, or “This month, it was a 30 day cycle, the next, it was 33 days, the month after that, it was 35”? The definition for “irregular periods” can vary according to who you’re talking to, but the bigger concern with the latter is that you might wind up MISSING your fertile days because you ovulate at different times in your cycle. But, that’s generally not a problem if you get the baby dance on every other day throughout your cycle.

If your cycles tend to be LESS than 21 says, that can be a problem with implantation – it may be a sign that you could be ovulating too soon into your cycle (ovulating before calendar day 9 is no bueno) or that your luteal phase (the period between ovulation and the beginning of your period) is not long enough to sustain a pregnancy.

Longer cycles – i.e., longer than 35 days – could also be an indication of problems like PCOS. Or, as is common with people a few months off of birth control, the end result of that. I started taking B6 during my 4th cycle because I was still irregular at that point, and I was taking a POP (not the combination pill), which tend to have the fewest side effects of all birth control.

 

First thing’s first: Hop on Ebay and get yourself some cheap ovulation predictor tests. Pee on one daily. If you don’t get a positive for, say, two months, definitely raise that with your doctor – it’s a fairly surefire sign that you’re either not ovulating or that your LH surges are so short that you’re not catching them. In either case, that’s a potential concern. If you don’t get a positive during your first month, it’s possible that you’re just testing after you’ve already ovulated or that you’re having a one-off anovulatory cycle – which can happen to anybody.

That said, an LH surge is also not a guarantee that you’re ovulating. Generally, people should get, at most, 2 days of positive OPKs. If the surge is lasting longer than that, it could be a risk factor for other problems…again, PCOS comes to mind.

However, an LH surge IS a good indication of things. You can do that in conjunction with taking your BBT; though of course, your BBT can actually confirm that you’re ovulating – OPKs can only predict the surge beforehand.

 

 

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