TTC with PCOS

posted 3 years ago in TTC
Post # 3
Hostess
3787 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

@FutureMrsA2014:  Hey there! I don’t have PCOS, but there are a lot of ladies on the boards that can probably give you a big picture. From what I’ve seen, it seems like it varies quite a bit depending on a lot of factors. Some actually get pregnant relatively quickly while others have a more difficult time. Good luck though!

Post # 4
Member
6067 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2012

Mrs. LemonDrop is right- there’s a large variety of experiences within the PCOS camp.

Luckily, I got pregnant on my first round of Clomid! I was very pleasantly surprised. I think losing weight helped as well.

I have heard mostly success stories when it comes to PCOS and fertility, so please stay optimistic!

My advice would be:

1) Try to get on a low GI, overall healthy diet & workout at least a few times a week

2) Don’t feel discouraged- everyone I know with PCOS have had healthy babies

3) Make sure to find a doctor you feel comfortable with, and trust. I had an awful one before I found a doctor that took my concerns seriously.

Good luck to you!

Post # 5
Member
3378 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@FutureMrsA2014:  I have PCOS, and for me, once I got past the hurdles that being on BC gave me, I found that I am very fertile and ovulate on my own.  In the past 2.5 years, I’ve been pregnant 7 times!  Obviously that’s both good and bad, since I’ve miscarried 6 times, HOWEVER, I also have multiple other issues, including the biggies of having had a killer septum (dead tissue in my uterus “perfectly” placed to be where the baby was most likely to implant), and progesterone deficiency.

With PCOS, a few things to really keep your eye on:  1. your thyroid.  Thyroid issues are VERY, very common with PCOS.  Make sure they are checking your thyroid antibodies in addition to your TSH.  2. Progesterone.  Having low or deficient progesterone pretty much comes with the PCOS territory.  Progesterone is imperative to pregnancy, so either force them to test for you, or, if you are in the USA, you can often order labs from places without a drs order (that’s what I’m currently doing to make sure that my progesterone is fine during my current pregnancy).  3.  Vitamin D levels.  Vitamin D deficiency (or being low) is also very common in PCOS.  4. Insulin resistance.  Also very common with PCOS.  Make sure they are giving you a timed glucose challenge test (2 or 3 hour) to verify whether you have insulin resistance or not (if you haven’t had one already).  If you have insulin resistance, that’s one thing that you want to address very quickly.  Insulin is a hormone, and anytime one hormone is out of balance, it knocks the rest out as well.  That for me, was my biggest issue.  Once I got that under control, everything else became a lot easier.

The thyroid and vitamin D deficiencies can and often do mess with cycle regularity and/or cause annovulatory cycles (no ovulation).  

It’s taken me 3.5 years, of which 17 months of that was trying to figure out why I wasn’t having ANY natural cycles after coming off of BC, and then working to lower my insulin resistance so that they came back.  The rest of the time has been spent, either pregnant or testing to see why I kept losing them.  We’ve finally figured it out, and I’m happy to say that I’m 15 weeks pregnant with a little girl who I firmly believe I will finally get to hold in my arms and watch grow up.  🙂

Hope this helps!  Best of luck! 

Post # 7
Member
1464 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

Hey, I have PCOS and got a surprise baby, after years of being told it would take a lot of effort.

DH and I were waiting until this August to TTC, as we had planned to be in a much better financial situation (I’d be done with immigration, and hopefully teaching and DH would be in grad school. We were intent on moving to ensure this was the case).

We went to the OBGYN early January for some blood tests and my preconception visit. We had set the plans for me to eat low-GI and lose weight from Jan-August, then look at Chlomid and Metformin. The next day my boobs started to hurt and a few days later I got a BFP! Turns out I was pregnant at the doctors visit, just so early none of us knew. On top of that, DH had been sick most of the previoous cycle, so there was only one occasion that I could have gotten pregnant, and I thought it was outside any potential window. So here I am, horribly sick with morning sickness and worried about finances, but overwhelmed with happiness!

Post # 8
Member
3378 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

@FutureMrsA2014:  TSH levels for ttc and pregnancy are best between 1-2, but do make sure they have tested your antibodies.  Most drs ONLY look at TSH, and that can miss things like Hashimotos and Graves.  Glad I could help!  <3

Post # 10
Member
6067 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2012

@FutureMrsA2014:  We were only ttc for 5 months. I live in Greece though, and here they don’t have the policy that you must be ttc for 1 year before even dealing with you. I personally disagree with that philosophy. I wasn’t ovulating at all, even after losing about 25lbs and working out. It would have been a waste of time to continue trying for 7 more when I wasn’t ovulating.

Everyone’s different though- that was just my own personal situation.

 

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