Vintage and Antique "Style" Rings ?

posted 3 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
2878 posts
Sugar bee

Here is mine. I don’t know if it’s really ”vintage”-style because I haven’t done a lot of researches over the true vintage or antique jewelry before purchasing it, but I knew I was looking for something that didn’t scream ”modern” and that would somehow be ”timeless”. That even though fashion changes over time, I wouldn’t grow tired of it. It is also one of the only ones, within the price range I was looking, that had embellishments on the sides, while most of the wedding bands I saw didn’t.

Post # 4
Member
2738 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

Interesting post! With your experience with auctions of real vintage jewelery, it is interesting you question what is the current “vintage” that is currently advertised. 

My ring was described as being “vintage-inspired” There is a double halo with different stone sizes, and the shank is plain. 

Post # 5
Member
657 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

My ring is one of those that is an “antique” styled ring. It doesn’t have tiny stones but there are smaller stones on it, the wedding band is curved with small stones and both rings have milgrain. I honestly think it’s a selling technique, most actual vintage rings I see are not diamonds and if they are the stones are much smaller than what’s used in rings today, making them seem very dainty (which is something I like). It’s sort of like how most people today thinks the 80s=neon spandex/big hair and when people think of the 1920s they assume everyone was glitzy and glammed up like The Great Gatsby or Chicago, we pick and choose what we want to remember about a time period. 

 

 

Post # 6
Member
681 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I hear what you’re saying about not having the tools to set multiple little diamonds. The detail came from the metal work back then.  Many pieces of true antique jewelry I’ve seen have filigree and beautiful craftsmanship. I consider my ring antique inspired for is metal work and intricate design.  Also I feel like the pave diamonds add a level of detail reminiscent of all the old metal detail which was done (think edwardian pieces) as strictly metal work, whereas now the diamonds bring in the detail while also adding bling. To me it’s the amount of detail similar to filligree which puts it in the antique inspired camp. Irrespective of pave diamonds having been around or not.  It’s the inspiration which propelled the modern design using present day tools.  

Post # 7
Member
5421 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

@MirnaMinkoff:  I hear what you’re saying re melee/pave/micro pave-set diamonds, as you don’t see these in genuine antiques. For me, ‘antique style’ refers to just that: the style. So, a lot of cluster/multi-stone rings, or certain ring shapes (eg daisy) are often referred to as ‘antique style’ as those styles/shapes are common in antique jewellery. Whereas I also see a lot of, say, halo rings marketed as being ‘antique style’ and for me these aren’t: they are, conversely, very modern IMPO, and I have never looked at a halo and thought ‘Oh, that looks antique!’ So I think sometimes it’s not misleading exactly, but is maybe trying to give a piece a kind of provenance/’history’ that it doesn’t actually have, if that makes sense.

I would describe my current ring as being antique-style, as although it has pave diamonds surroudning the centre stones and on the shoulders, the shape and the fact it is a cluster lend it an antique look. Also because of the colour clarity and cut of the stones, they sparkle a certain way and have what at times is an almost grey colour which for me looks at times like an older ring; often you see that same colour. Weirdly, while my new ring is pretty much an exact copy, the colour of the stones and the way they sparkle makes it look much more modern. So, I think different factors come into play.

However, I’ve had a LOT of people ask if my ring is antique: so, it must have that certain look about it. Here’s my current ring:

And my new one:

And both of them together (kind of hard to capture what I mean by them looking different in a photo; I think it’s more obvious in real-life):

 

Post # 9
Member
2878 posts
Sugar bee

Just adding, I don’t know if it’s clear enough on my picture, but I actually don’t have a stone on my ring. It’s white gold, with diamond dust in the middle ! 

I think vintage-style is somewhat inspired from shapes of styles of an era, but don’t necessarily replicate it.

If you want a true vintage or antique ring, why not look in flea markets, antiques shops and places like that, where you could find authentic jewelry that used to be someone’s grandmother or great-grandmother’s ring ? I might eventually buy a more expensive one, and those are places I would go ring-hunting for authentic vintage jewlry. 🙂

Post # 11
Member
5421 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2014

@MirnaMinkoff:  I would have LOVED a vintage ring, but, I did want the micro-pave which they didn’t have.

Also, thanks for the info re diamond colours: that makes so much sense! The stones in my original ring are H-I coloured, and in my new one they’re D coloured. What you said about the cut is also interesting: they sparkle very differently, it’s hard to explain though without being able to show someone IRL; but my original one looks particularly great in certain lights, esp candle-light.

Re my centre arrangement: yes, it’s quite typical of antique rings; you see a lot of antique ‘daisy’ clusters (as they’re typically called). But they don’t have the micro-pave halo like mine does.

Post # 12
Member
998 posts
Busy bee

@chouette:  +1!

I think the key word with these rings is style, not vintage or antique. For example, modern halos are inspired by those Victorian daisy clusters, but with bigger center stones and pave accents to better appeal to today’s tastes. As a result of other present-day tastes, such as white metals being the predominant metal you’ll see in a jewelry store, you’ll notice less rose gold than Victorian rings, but a similar amount compared to the Art Deco era.

Although this post is about e-rings, true vintage wedding bands are rarely used due to designs that aren’t conducive to resizing. All that engraving and filigree can only be made a bit bigger if it goes all the way around the ring. 

Post # 13
Member
11300 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

Mine is vintage-style. I have filigree and milgrain, which are pretty antique details. 

Funny you say that stones on the band and halos are modern, considering my great grandma’s ring from the late 1920s looked very similar to mine (halo, details, etc.).

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