Volunteer at Cat Shelter, BFP

posted 2 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 2
Member
2003 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

swimcat14:  Can you use some excuse to get out of these next 2-4 weeks volunteering and then maybe you’ll be far enough along to be able to tell them why?

Post # 3
Member
2253 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

swimcat14:  could you continue to volunteer, but in a different capacity? Maybe help out with administrative tasks or marketing the adoptable cats on social media? 

Post # 4
Member
20 posts
Newbee

I think there are a lot of work you can do for the shelter thats safe to do. Laundry, dishes, feeding the cats. I think as long that you are not exposed to the cat litter or feces, It should be okay 🙂

Post # 5
Member
360 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

If you want to keep volunteering, you can ask your doctor to test for toxoplasmosis.  If you already have it them you don’t have to worry -it’s only potentially dangerous during initial infection. If you don’t want to volunteer anymore, I would probably just say I had to take a leave for X weeks and then tell them later why.

Post # 6
Member
866 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

I would just tell them why you can’t come around and ask them to please keep your confidence. I would think they could manage that. 

Post # 7
Member
244 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

As a non profit dog rescue cofounder, I know the importance of volunteers. I would just tell them you have a weakened immune system at the moment and want to know how else you can help aside from cleaning the cat boxes. Be honest about the reasoning (weakened immune system, don’t need to say pregnancy specifically) and they’ll LOVE your offer to help in another capacity.

Post # 8
Member
110 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

I work at an animal shelter with cats as the volunteer supervisor and am also TTC, so I have given a lot of thought to this situation.

I have had volunteers resign due to pregnancy and *of course* I never spread that information to anyone; more often, though, volunteers let me know that they have  “medical issues” that prevent them from volunteering and I’m happy to leave it vague, wish them well, and encourage them to come back to volunteer when they can.

As someone who works with formerly stray cats every day and plans to continuing doing so when/if I get pregnant, I’ve spoken to a lot of doctors about minimizing the risk of contracting toxo. If you do keep volunteering, or for anyone else wondering about it, the best precautions to take are avoiding  litter boxes entirely and wearing gloves when working with unknown/stray/feral cats.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 1 month ago by  canuba.
Post # 9
Member
110 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

RMBsbride:  That’s a good point, too – it’s very possible that there are other areas for volunteers at the shelter. OP; prepping the cat food, administrative support, or helping clients with adoptions are all areas where you would be at almost no risk for toxo and would still be a big help to the shelter!

Post # 10
Member
2368 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

I was a vet tech at a small animal hospital. Every female that worked there that was even vaguely considering children got tested for toxoplasmosis. Most were already positive, so the litter box issue was no longer a problem. The negative ones just didn’t handle the cleaning if they were pregnant.

There are lots of ways for you to continue to volunteer, even if you’re toxo negative. You can hhelp with adoptions, clerical duties, fundraising, etc.

Post # 14
Member
550 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: March 2014

i asked about this at my intial appointment…she said that single women who couldn’t NOT scoop just wore face masks and washed their hands after.

Post # 15
Member
1450 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2012

I was in the same position. I told them I was out for health reasons then later told them the truth. I know I’d stress and psych myself out if I volunteered though and it was best for me to not risk it. I was working at a high intake county shelter with tons of strays which increased the risks. The no kill might be more sanitary and have better policies so you could always ask the volunteer coordinator. 

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