Want to rescue a pup!- any breed suggestions?

posted 2 years ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
2704 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

Lab mix!

Those were our guidelines too, except we ended up getting a female and we don’t have a cat. We have a border collie/lab mix and we LOVE her. We rescued her young (13 weeks) and we couldn’t imagine our lives with out her.

She’s energetic enough to keep up with us on hikes and walks (we’re outdoors a lot) but she also loves being lazy and having movie days (that’s probably the lab in her, haha).

Good luck! Adoption is great!

Here’s our Moose! 🙂

Post # 3
Member
1619 posts
Bumble bee

I was going to say either golden (mix) and/or Lab (mix)

Goldens are out because of long hair, labs may be challenging due to … some don’t play nice with cats and they have a reputation for a protracted adolescence (read: mischevious … destructive when bored).

Is shedding the ‘hair’ issue?  That may not be a problem if you can find a resuce ‘doodle’ – all of them I’ve met seem to have nice attitudes.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 4 months ago by  .
Post # 4
Member
2704 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 2015

fascinated:  Our neighbour has a labradoodle! He is AMAZING! I would take him in a heart beat. I’ve never seen any for adoption, they’re usually pretty expensive. But, if you did find one, get him!

Also, our lab-mix has NEVER done anything distructive, she went through a weird shoe-relocation phase where I would find my shoes everywhere (not chewed though). Thank god that’s over with haha. Otherwise, we can leave her inside for hours while we’re at work, with stuff everywhere and food on the table/counter and she’s never touched it.

Post # 6
Member
423 posts
Helper bee

We had a lab. that we took hiking a lot. She was a very loving dog and would have laid down her life for my FI. In her old age, we had to stop taking her hiking and camping and I’m sure it hurt her feelings. Her legs would give out under her. The last time we took her hiking we had to carry her out. These problems will exist in all dogs though. Like humans, they age too. She was a big dog. She shed a lot. It’s been a few years and I am still finding her hair in the baseboards. She got along fine with our cat… I don’t even think she noticed her, lol.

We now have a vizsla. We got him as a running partner. He is a very energetic dog that loves camping, hiking, swimming, and everything outdoors. He loves people and kids. The only caution I will give is vizslas need to be exercised. A lot of websites will tell you that they can develop destructive behaviors like digging if they become bored. We’ve never had an issue with ours. We raised him from a puppy and crate trained him until we trusted him to be left alone for a work shift, which didn’t take long. There again, it’s all about how you raise your dog. He is a medium dog, weighing 55-60 lbs. and sheds very little. He snuggles with our cat. When we get another dog it will be a vizsla. He is a doll.

  • This reply was modified 2 years, 4 months ago by  UnderTheSun14. Reason: For photo
Post # 7
Member
7265 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2013

We rescued a purebred lab, and she meets all those requirements (other than being a girl). She will be 2 in October, and she is seriously the laziest dog when she’s in the house. We have a 9 month old, and she has been great with her since day one. She is very gentle around her, and follows her around to make sure she’s okay. It’s adorable. Shw is very smart and obedient. She LOVES people, but she is also protective of our apartment, and I feel safe because she’s here. She has an intimidating bark, but would probably just lick someone to death. Her only downside is that she sheds a lot.

Post # 8
Member
812 posts
Busy bee

I think instead of limiting yourself to a certain breed, you should go to the shelters and find the one that FITS. We decided to rescue another dog after we bought our house and the only stipulation was ir needed to be male and around ten weeks old. We have a 7 year old schnauzer is is Queen B so we didn’t want her to be threatened, and by getting a smaller male (who is now triple her size) worked perfectly. I said I wanted only a lab or Weimaraner mix….. But could you refuse this face?? Labs are great family dogs, I grew up with multiple, but so many other breeds get overlooked because they aren’t the “ideal breed”. 

Post # 9
Member
1619 posts
Bumble bee

I guess I should clarify.  Every dog does teenaged mischeviousness – it’s part of the fun (and frustration) of having a young dog.  It’s just that my friends who have labs tend to feel that labs stay in that mischevious phase longer than some other breeds.  (Or maybe they just have dogs that are are the far end of the ‘impish’ curve:)  ) 

Post # 10
Member
812 posts
Busy bee

fascinated: Most Labs stay in that puppy phase till three or four years old! Lol. Never a dull moment though and they are loyal and versatile. 🙂

Post # 12
Member
479 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

Short haired dogs don’t necessarily shed less than long haired.  I have a shepherd mix who sheds like nobody’s business!  

Post # 14
Member
479 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

I have wood floors too so I just vacuum up the tumbleweeds.  I grew up with shelties though and even when I think about times having 2 shelties and 2-3 cats there was less fur in the house than with my 1 40 pound mutt that I have now.  It’s insane.  I also initally chose short hair because I assumed it would be less hassle- nope!  But he’s a sweetie and I love him so I put up with it and would definitely get a similar dog in the future.  His only issue is not liking strange dogs, bu that’s because he had some scary experiences in the past.

Post # 15
Member
73 posts
Worker bee

I’m very biased, but we love our golden retriever so, so much. We picked the breed because they are generally very easy to train, cuddly, sociable, and active but not high-maintenance—and she is all of those things! She was the teacher’s pet at obedience school 🙂 We also considered a lab but decided they were too big for us. If you do choose a particular breed, it’s worth researching breed-specific rescue groups in your area.

Here’s my favorite of her baby photos 

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